シャーロック・ホームズの記憶 1.白銀の失踪

シャーロック・ホームズシリーズの中でも評価の高い短編が集められた短編集シャーロック・ホームズの記憶です。

こちらのページでは、原文全てと和訳をのせてまいります。

Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

 

Adventure I. Silver Blaze

silver blaze 1

“I am afraid, Watson, that I shall have to go,” said Holmes, as we sat down together to our breakfast one morning. “Go! Where to?” “To Dartmoor; to King’s Pyland.” I was not surprised. Indeed, my only wonder was that he had not already been mixed upon this extraordinary case, which was the one topic of conversation through the length and breadth of England. For a whole day my companion had rambled about the room with his chin upon his chest and his brows knitted, charging and recharging his pipe with the strongest black tobacco, and absolutely deaf to any of my questions or remarks. Fresh editions of every paper had been sent up by our news agent, only to be glanced over and tossed down into a corner. Yet, silent as he was, I knew perfectly well what it was over which he was brooding. There was but one problem before the public which could challenge his powers of analysis, and that was the singular disappearance of the favorite for the Wessex Cup, 1 2 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes and the tragic murder of its trainer. When, therefore, he suddenly announced his intention of setting out for the scene of the drama it was only what I had both expected and hoped for. “I should be most happy to go down with you if I should not be in the way,” said I. “My dear Watson, you would confer a great favor upon me by coming. And I think that your time will not be misspent, for there are points about the case which promise to make it an absolutely unique one. We have, I think, just time to catch our train at Paddington, and I will go further into the matter upon our journey. You would oblige me by bringing with you your very excellent field-glass.” And so it happened that an hour or so later I found myself in the corner of a firstclass carriage flying along en route for Exeter, while Sherlock Holmes, with his sharp, eager face framed in his ear-flapped travelling-cap, dipped rapidly into the bundle of fresh papers which he had procured at Paddington. We had left Reading far behind us before he thrust the last one of them under the seat, and offered me his cigar-case. “We are going well,” said he, looking out the window and glancing at his watch. “Our rate at present is fifty-three and a half miles an hour.” “I have not observed the quarter-mile posts,” said I. “Nor have I. But the telegraph posts upon this line are sixty yards apart, and the calculation is a simple one. I presume that you Silver Blaze 3 have looked into this matter of the murder of John Straker and the disappearance of Silver Blaze?” “I have seen what the Telegraph and the Chronicle have to say.” “It is one of those cases where the art of the reasoner should be used rather for the sifting of details than for the acquiring of fresh evidence. The tragedy has been so uncommon, so complete and of such personal importance to so many people, that we are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture, and hypothesis. The difficulty is to detach the framework of fact—of absolute undeniable fact— from the embellishments of theorists and reporters. Then, having established ourselves upon this sound basis, it is our duty to see what inferences may be drawn and what are the special points upon which the whole mystery turns. On Tuesday evening I received telegrams from both Colonel Ross, the owner of the horse, and from Inspector Gregory, who is looking after the case, inviting my cooperation. “Tuesday evening!” I exclaimed. “And this is Thursday morning. Why didn’t you go down yesterday?” “Because I made a blunder, my dear Watson—which is, I am afraid, a more common occurrence than any one would think who only knew me through your memoirs. The fact is that I could not believe is possible that the most remarkable horse in England could long remain concealed, especially in so sparsely inhabited a place as the north 4 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes of Dartmoor. From hour to hour yesterday I expected to hear that he had been found, and that his abductor was the murderer of John Straker. When, however, another morning had come, and I found that beyond the arrest of young Fitzroy Simpson nothing had been done, I felt that it was time for me to take action. Yet in some ways I feel that yesterday has not been wasted.” “You have formed a theory, then?” “At least I have got a grip of the essential facts of the case. I shall enumerate them to you, for nothing clears up a case so much as stating it to another person, and I can hardly expect your co-operation if I do not show you the position from which we start.” I lay back against the cushions, puffing at my cigar, while Holmes, leaning forward, with his long, thin forefinger checking off the points upon the palm of his left hand, gave me a sketch of the events which had led to our journey. “Silver Blaze,” said he, “is from the Somomy stock, and holds as brilliant a record as his famous ancestor. He is now in his fifth year, and has brought in turn each of the prizes of the turf to Colonel Ross, his fortunate owner. Up to the time of the catastrophe he was the first favorite for the Wessex Cup, the betting being three to one on him. He has always, however, been a prime favorite with the racing public, and has never yet disappointed them, so that even at those odds enormous sums of money have been laid upon him. It is obvious, therefore, that there were many Silver Blaze 5 Holmes gave me a sketch of the events. 6 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes people who had the strongest interest in preventing Silver Blaze from being there at the fall of the flag next Tuesday. “The fact was, of course, appreciated at King’s Pyland, where the Colonel’s trainingstable is situated. Every precaution was taken to guard the favorite. The trainer, John Straker, is a retired jockey who rode in Colonel Ross’s colors before he became too heavy for the weighing-chair. He has served the Colonel for five years as jockey and for seven as trainer, and has always shown himself to be a zealous and honest servant. Under him were three lads; for the establishment was a small one, containing only four horses in all. One of these lads sat up each night in the stable, while the others slept in the loft. All three bore excellent characters. John Straker, who is a married man, lived in a small villa about two hundred yards from the stables. He has no children, keeps one maidservant, and is comfortably off. The country round is very lonely, but about half a mile to the north there is a small cluster of villas which have been built by a Tavistock contractor for the use of invalids and others who may wish to enjoy the pure Dartmoor air.

silver blaze 2

Tavistock itself lies two miles to the west, while across the moor, also about two miles distant, is the larger training establishment of Mapleton, which belongs to Lord Backwater, and is managed by Silas Brown. In every other direction the moor is a complete wilderness, inhabited only by a few roaming gypsies. Such was the general situation last Monday night Silver Blaze 7 when the catastrophe occurred. “On that evening the horses had been exercised and watered as usual, and the stables were locked up at nine o’clock. Two of the lads walked up to the trainer’s house, where they had supper in the kitchen, while the third, Ned Hunter, remained on guard. At a few minutes after nine the maid, Edith Baxter, carried down to the stables his supper, which consisted of a dish of curried mutton. She took no liquid, as there was a water-tap in the stables, and it was the rule that the lad on duty should drink nothing else. The maid carried a lantern with her, as it was very dark and the path ran across the open moor. “Edith Baxter was within thirty yards of the stables, when a man appeared out of the darkness and called to her to stop. As he stepped into the circle of yellow light thrown by the lantern she saw that he was a person of gentlemanly bearing, dressed in a gray suit of tweeds, with a cloth cap. He wore gaiters, and carried a heavy stick with a knob to it. She was most impressed, however, by the extreme pallor of his face and by the nervousness of his manner. His age, she thought, would be rather over thirty than under it. “‘Can you tell me where I am?’ he asked. ‘I had almost made up my mind to sleep on the moor, when I saw the light of your lantern.’ “‘You are close to the King’s Pyland training-stables,’ said she. “‘Oh, indeed! What a stroke of luck!’ he cried. ‘I understand that a stable-boy sleeps there alone every night. Perhaps that is his 8 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes A man appeared out of the darkness. Silver Blaze 9 supper which you are carrying to him. Now I am sure that you would not be too proud to earn the price of a new dress, would you?’ He took a piece of white paper folded up out of his waistcoat pocket. ‘See that the boy has this tonight, and you shall have the prettiest frock that money can buy.’ “She was frightened by the earnestness of his manner, and ran past him to the window through which she was accustomed to hand the meals. It was already opened, and Hunter was seated at the small table inside. She had begun to tell him of what had happened, when the stranger came up again. “‘Good-evening,’ said he, looking through the window. ‘I wanted to have a word with you.’ The girl has sworn that as he spoke she noticed the corner of the little paper packet protruding from his closed hand. “‘What business have you here?’ asked the lad. “‘It’s business that may put something into your pocket,’ said the other. ‘You’ve two horses in for the Wessex Cup—Silver Blaze and Bayard. Let me have the straight tip and you won’t be a loser. Is it a fact that at the weights Bayard could give the other a hundred yards in five furlongs, and that the stable have put their money on him?’ “‘So, you’re one of those damned touts!’ cried the lad. ‘I’ll show you how we serve them in King’s Pyland.’ He sprang up and rushed across the stable to unloose the dog. The girl fled away to the house, but as she ran she looked back and saw that the stranger 10 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes was leaning through the window. A minute later, however, when Hunter rushed out with the hound he was gone, and though he ran all round the buildings he failed to find any trace of him.” “One moment,” I asked. “Did the stableboy, when he ran out with the dog, leave the door unlocked behind him?” “Excellent, Watson, excellent!” murmured my companion. “The importance of the point struck me so forcibly that I sent a special wire to Dartmoor yesterday to clear the matter up. The boy locked the door before he left it. The window, I may add, was not large enough for a man to get through. “Hunter waited until his fellow-grooms had returned, when he sent a message to the trainer and told him what had occurred. Straker was excited at hearing the account, although he does not seem to have quite realized its true significance. It left him, however, vaguely uneasy, and Mrs. Straker, waking at one in the morning, found that he was dressing. In reply to her inquiries, he said that he could not sleep on account of his anxiety about the horses, and that he intended to walk down to the stables to see that all was well. She begged him to remain at home, as she could hear the rain pattering against the window, but in spite of her entreaties he pulled on his large mackintosh and left the house. “Mrs. Straker awoke at seven in the morning, to find that her husband had not yet returned. She dressed herself hastily, called the maid, and set off for the stables. The door was Silver Blaze 11 open; inside, huddled together upon a chair, Hunter was sunk in a state of absolute stupor, the favorite’s stall was empty, and there were no signs of his trainer. “The two lads who slept in the chaffcutting loft above the harness-room were quickly aroused. They had heard nothing during the night, for they are both sound sleepers. Hunter was obviously under the influence of some powerful drug, and as no sense could be got out of him, he was left to sleep it off while the two lads and the two women ran out in search of the absentees. They still had hopes that the trainer had for some reason taken out the horse for early exercise, but on ascending the knoll near the house, from which all the neighboring moors were visible, they not only could see no signs of the missing favorite, but they perceived something which warned them that they were in the presence of a tragedy. “About a quarter of a mile from the stables John Straker’s overcoat was flapping from a furze-bush. Immediately beyond there was a bowl-shaped depression in the moor, and at the bottom of this was found the dead body of the unfortunate trainer. His head had been shattered by a savage blow from some heavy weapon, and he was wounded on the thigh, where there was a long, clean cut, inflicted evidently by some very sharp instrument. It was clear, however, that Straker had defended himself vigorously against his assailants, for in his right hand he held a small knife, which was clotted with blood up to the handle, while in his left he clasped a red and black silk 12 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes They found the dead body of the unfortunate trainer. Silver Blaze 13 cravat, which was recognized by the maid as having been worn on the preceding evening by the stranger who had visited the stables. Hunter, on recovering from his stupor, was also quite positive as to the ownership of the cravat. He was equally certain that the same stranger had, while standing at the window, drugged his curried mutton, and so deprived the stables of their watchman. As to the missing horse, there were abundant proofs in the mud which lay at the bottom of the fatal hollow that he had been there at the time of the struggle. But from that morning he has disappeared, and although a large reward has been offered, and all the gypsies of Dartmoor are on the alert, no news has come of him. Finally, an analysis has shown that the remains of his supper left by the stable-lad contain an appreciable quantity of powdered opium, while the people at the house partook of the same dish on the same night without any ill effect. “Those are the main facts of the case, stripped of all surmise, and stated as baldly as possible. I shall now recapitulate what the police have done in the matter. “Inspector Gregory, to whom the case has been committed, is an extremely competent officer. Were he but gifted with imagination he might rise to great heights in his profession. On his arrival he promptly found and arrested the man upon whom suspicion naturally rested. There was little difficulty in finding him, for he inhabited one of those villas which I have mentioned. His name, it appears, was Fitzroy Simpson. He was a man of 14 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes excellent birth and education, who had squandered a fortune upon the turf, and who lived now by doing a little quiet and genteel bookmaking in the sporting clubs of London. An examination of his betting-book shows that bets to the amount of five thousand pounds had been registered by him against the favorite. On being arrested he volunteered that statement that he had come down to Dartmoor in the hope of getting some information about the King’s Pyland horses, and also about Desborough, the second favorite, which was in charge of Silas Brown at the Mapleton stables. He did not attempt to deny that he had acted as described upon the evening before, but declared that he had no sinister designs, and had simply wished to obtain first-hand information. When confronted with his cravat, he turned very pale, and was utterly unable to account for its presence in the hand of the murdered man. His wet clothing showed that he had been out in the storm of the night before, and his stick, which was a Penang-lawyer weighted with lead, was just such a weapon as might, by repeated blows, have inflicted the terrible injuries to which the trainer had succumbed. On the other hand, there was no wound upon his person, while the state of Straker’s knife would show that one at least of his assailants must bear his mark upon him. There you have it all in a nutshell, Watson, and if you can give me any light I shall be infinitely obliged to you.” I had listened with the greatest interest to the statement which Holmes, with character- Silver Blaze 15 istic clearness, had laid before me. Though most of the facts were familiar to me, I had not sufficiently appreciated their relative importance, nor their connection to each other. “Is in not possible,” I suggested, “that the incised wound upon Straker may have been caused by his own knife in the convulsive struggles which follow any brain injury?” “It is more than possible; it is probable,” said Holmes. “In that case one of the main points in favor of the accused disappears.” “And yet,” said I, “even now I fail to understand what the theory of the police can be.” “I am afraid that whatever theory we state has very grave objections to it,” returned my companion. “The police imagine, I take it, that this Fitzroy Simpson, having drugged the lad, and having in some way obtained a duplicate key, opened the stable door and took out the horse, with the intention, apparently, of kidnapping him altogether. His bridle is missing, so that Simpson must have put this on. Then, having left the door open behind him, he was leading the horse away over the moor, when he was either met or overtaken by the trainer. A row naturally ensued. Simpson beat out the trainer’s brains with his heavy stick without receiving any injury from the small knife which Straker used in self-defence, and then the thief either led the horse on to some secret hiding-place, or else it may have bolted during the struggle, and be now wandering out on the moors. That is the case as it appears to the police, and improbable as it is, all other explanations are more improbable still. However, I 16 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes shall very quickly test the matter when I am once upon the spot, and until then I cannot really see how we can get much further than our present position.” It was evening before we reached the little town of Tavistock, which lies, like the boss of a shield, in the middle of the huge circle of Dartmoor. Two gentlemen were awaiting us in the station—the one a tall, fair man with lion-like hair and beard and curiously penetrating light blue eyes; the other a small, alert person, very neat and dapper, in a frock-coat and gaiters, with trim little side-whiskers and an eye-glass. The latter was Colonel Ross, the well-known sportsman; the other, Inspector Gregory, a man who was rapidly making his name in the English detective service. “I am delighted that you have come down, Mr. Holmes,” said the Colonel. “The Inspector here has done all that could possibly be suggested, but I wish to leave no stone unturned in trying to avenge poor Straker and in recovering my horse.” “Have there been any fresh developments?” asked Holmes. “I am sorry to say that we have made very little progress,” said the Inspector. “We have an open carriage outside, and as you would no doubt like to see the place before the light fails, we might talk it over as we drive.” A minute later we were all seated in a comfortable landau, and were rattling through the quaint old Devonshire city. Inspector Gregory was full of his case, and poured out a stream of remarks, while Holmes threw in an Silver Blaze 17 “I am delighted that you have come down, Mr. Holmes.” 18 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes occasional question or interjection. Colonel Ross leaned back with his arms folded and his hat tilted over his eyes, while I listened with interest to the dialogue of the two detectives. Gregory was formulating his theory, which was almost exactly what Holmes had foretold in the train. “The net is drawn pretty close round Fitzroy Simpson,” he remarked, “and I believe myself that he is our man. At the same time I recognize that the evidence is purely circumstantial, and that some new development may upset it.” “How about Straker’s knife?” “We have quite come to the conclusion that he wounded himself in his fall.” “My friend Dr. Watson made that suggestion to me as we came down. If so, it would tell against this man Simpson.” “Undoubtedly. He has neither a knife nor any sign of a wound. The evidence against him is certainly very strong. He had a great interest in the disappearance of the favorite. He lies under suspicion of having poisoned the stable-boy, he was undoubtedly out in the storm, he was armed with a heavy stick, and his cravat was found in the dead man’s hand. I really think we have enough to go before a jury.” Holmes shook his head. “A clever counsel would tear it all to rags,” said he. “Why should he take the horse out of the stable? If he wished to injure it why could he not do it there? Has a duplicate key been found in his possession? What chemist sold him the pow- Silver Blaze 19 dered opium? Above all, where could he, a stranger to the district, hide a horse, and such a horse as this? What is his own explanation as to the paper which he wished the maid to give to the stable-boy?” “He says that it was a ten-pound note. One was found in his purse. But your other diffi- culties are not so formidable as they seem. He is not a stranger to the district. He has twice lodged at Tavistock in the summer.

 

silver blaze 3

The opium was probably brought from London. The key, having served its purpose, would be hurled away. The horse may be at the bottom of one of the pits or old mines upon the moor.” “What does he say about the cravat?” “He acknowledges that it is his, and declares that he had lost it. But a new element has been introduced into the case which may account for his leading the horse from the stable.” Holmes pricked up his ears. “We have found traces which show that a party of gypsies encamped on Monday night within a mile of the spot where the murder took place. On Tuesday they were gone. Now, presuming that there was some understanding between Simpson and these gypsies, might he not have been leading the horse to them when he was overtaken, and may they not have him now?” “It is certainly possible.” “The moor is being scoured for these gypsies. I have also examined every stable and out-house in Tavistock, and for a radius of ten miles.” 20 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “There is another training-stable quite close, I understand?” “Yes, and that is a factor which we must certainly not neglect. As Desborough, their horse, was second in the betting, they had an interest in the disappearance of the favorite. Silas Brown, the trainer, is known to have had large bets upon the event, and he was no friend to poor Straker. We have, however, examined the stables, and there is nothing to connect him with the affair.” “And nothing to connect this man Simpson with the interests of the Mapleton stables?” “Nothing at all.” Holmes leaned back in the carriage, and the conversation ceased. A few minutes later our driver pulled up at a neat little red-brick villa with overhanging eaves which stood by the road. Some distance off, across a paddock, lay a long gray-tiled out-building. In every other direction the low curves of the moor, bronze-colored from the fading ferns, stretched away to the sky-line, broken only by the steeples of Tavistock, and by a cluster of houses away to the westward which marked the Mapleton stables. We all sprang out with the exception of Holmes, who continued to lean back with his eyes fixed upon the sky in front of him, entirely absorbed in his own thoughts. It was only when I touched his arm that he roused himself with a violent start and stepped out of the carriage. “Excuse me,” said he, turning to Colonel Ross, who had looked at him in some surprise. “I was day-dreaming.” There was a Silver Blaze 21 gleam in his eyes and a suppressed excitement in his manner which convinced me, used as I was to his ways, that his hand was upon a clue, though I could not imagine where he had found it. “Perhaps you would prefer at once to go on to the scene of the crime, Mr. Holmes?” said Gregory. “I think that I should prefer to stay here a little and go into one or two questions of detail. Straker was brought back here, I presume?” “Yes; he lies upstairs. The inquest is tomorrow.” “He has been in your service some years, Colonel Ross?” “I have always found him an excellent servant.” “I presume that you made an inventory of what he had in this pockets at the time of his death, Inspector?” “I have the things themselves in the sitting-room, if you would care to see them.” “I should be very glad.” We all filed into the front room and sat round the central table while the Inspector unlocked a square tin box and laid a small heap of things before us. There was a box of vestas, two inches of tallow candle, an A D P brier-root pipe, a pouch of seal-skin with half an ounce of long-cut Cavendish, a silver watch with a gold chain, five sovereigns in gold, an aluminum pencilcase, a few papers, and an ivory-handled knife with a very delicate, inflexible blade marked Weiss & Co., London. 22 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “This is a very singular knife,” said Holmes, lifting it up and examining it minutely. “I presume, as I see blood-stains upon it, that it is the one which was found in the dead man’s grasp. Watson, this knife is surely in your line?” “It is what we call a cataract knife,” said I. “I thought so. A very delicate blade devised for very delicate work. A strange thing for a man to carry with him upon a rough expedition, especially as it would not shut in his pocket.” “The tip was guarded by a disk of cork which we found beside his body,” said the Inspector. “His wife tells us that the knife had lain upon the dressing-table, and that he had picked it up as he left the room. It was a poor weapon, but perhaps the best that he could lay his hands on at the moment.” “Very possible. How about these papers?” “Three of them are receipted hay-dealers’ accounts. One of them is a letter of instructions from Colonel Ross. This other is a milliner’s account for thirty-seven pounds fifteen made out by Madame Lesurier, of Bond Street, to William Derbyshire. Mrs. Straker tells us that Derbyshire was a friend of her husband’s and that occasionally his letters were addressed here.” “Madam Derbyshire had somewhat expensive tastes,” remarked Holmes, glancing down the account. “Twenty-two guineas is rather heavy for a single costume. However there appears to be nothing more to learn, and we may now go down to the scene of the crime.” Silver Blaze 23 As we emerged from the sitting-room a woman, who had been waiting in the passage, took a step forward and laid her hand upon the Inspector’s sleeve. Her face was haggard and thin and eager, stamped with the print of a recent horror. “Have you found them?” she panted. “Have you got them? Have you found them?” she panted. 24 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “No, Mrs. Straker. But Mr. Holmes here has come from London to help us, and we shall do all that is possible.” “Surely I met you in Plymouth at a gardenparty some little time ago, Mrs. Straker?” said Holmes. “No, sir; you are mistaken.” “Dear me! Why, I could have sworn to it. You wore a costume of dove-colored silk with ostrich-feather trimming.” “I never had such a dress, sir,” answered the lady. “Ah, that quite settles it,” said Holmes. And with an apology he followed the Inspector outside. A short walk across the moor took us to the hollow in which the body had been found. At the brink of it was the furze-bush upon which the coat had been hung. “There was no wind that night, I understand,” said Holmes. “None; but very heavy rain.” “In that case the overcoat was not blown against the furze-bush, but placed there.” “Yes, it was laid across the bush.” “You fill me with interest, I perceive that the ground has been trampled up a good deal. No doubt many feet have been here since Monday night.” “A piece of matting has been laid here at the side, and we have all stood upon that.” “Excellent.” “In this bag I have one of the boots which Straker wore, one of Fitzroy Simpson’s shoes, and a cast horseshoe of Silver Blaze.” “My dear Inspector, you surpass yourself!” Silver Blaze 25 Homes took the bag, and, descending into the hollow, he pushed the matting into a more central position. Then stretching himself upon his face and leaning his chin upon his hands, he made a careful study of the trampled mud in front of him. “Hullo!” said he, suddenly. “What’s this?” It was a wax vesta half burned, which was so coated with mud that it looked at first like a little chip of wood. “I cannot think how I came to overlook it,” said the Inspector, with an expression of annoyance. “It was invisible, buried in the mud. I only saw it because I was looking for it.” “What! You expected to find it?” “I thought it not unlikely.” He took the boots from the bag, and compared the impressions of each of them with marks upon the ground. Then he clambered up to the rim of the hollow, and crawled about among the ferns and bushes. “I am afraid that there are no more tracks,” said the Inspector. “I have examined the ground very carefully for a hundred yards in each direction.” “Indeed!” said Holmes, rising. “I should not have the impertinence to do it again after what you say. But I should like to take a little walk over the moor before it grows dark, that I may know my ground to-morrow, and I think that I shall put this horseshoe into my pocket for luck.” Colonel Ross, who had shown some signs of impatience at my companion’s quiet and systematic method of work, glanced at his watch. 26 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “I wish you would come back with me, Inspector,” said he. “There are several points on which I should like your advice, and especially as to whether we do not owe it to the public to remove our horse’s name from the entries for the Cup.” “Certainly not,” cried Holmes, with decision. “I should let the name stand.” The Colonel bowed. “I am very glad to have had your opinion, sir,” said he. “You will find us at poor Straker’s house when you have finished your walk, and we can drive together into Tavistock.” He turned back with the Inspector, while Holmes and I walked slowly across the moor. The sun was beginning to sink behind the stables of Mapleton, and the long, sloping plain in front of us was tinged with gold, deepening into rich, ruddy browns where the faded ferns and brambles caught the evening light. But the glories of the landscape were all wasted upon my companion, who was sunk in the deepest thought. “It’s this way, Watson,” said he at last. “We may leave the question of who killed John Straker for the instant, and confine ourselves to finding out what has become of the horse. Now, supposing that he broke away during or after the tragedy, where could he have gone to? The horse is a very gregarious creature. If left to himself his instincts would have been either to return to King’s Pyland or go over to Mapleton. Why should he run wild upon the moor? He would surely have been seen by now. And why should gypsies kidnap him? Silver Blaze 27 These people always clear out when they hear of trouble, for they do not wish to be pestered by the police. They could not hope to sell such a horse. They would run a great risk and gain nothing by taking him. Surely that is clear.” “Where is he, then?” “I have already said that he must have gone to King’s Pyland or to Mapleton. He is not at King’s Pyland. Therefore he is at Mapleton. Let us take that as a working hypothesis and see what it leads us to. This part of the moor, as the Inspector remarked, is very hard and dry. But if falls away towards Mapleton, and you can see from here that there is a long hollow over yonder, which must have been very wet on Monday night. If our supposition is correct, then the horse must have crossed that, and there is the point where we should look for his tracks.” We had been walking briskly during this conversation, and a few more minutes brought us to the hollow in question. At Holmes’ request I walked down the bank to the right, and he to the left, but I had not taken fifty paces before I heard him give a shout, and saw him waving his hand to me. The track of a horse was plainly outlined in the soft earth in front of him, and the shoe which he took from his pocket exactly fitted the impression. “See the value of imagination,” said Holmes. “It is the one quality which Gregory lacks. We imagined what might have happened, acted upon the supposition, and find ourselves justified. Let us proceed.” 28 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes We crossed the marshy bottom and passed over a quarter of a mile of dry, hard turf. Again the ground sloped, and again we came on the tracks. Then we lost them for half a mile, but only to pick them up once more quite close to Mapleton. It was Holmes who saw them first, and he stood pointing with a look of triumph upon his face. A man’s track was visible beside the horse’s. “The horse was alone before,” I cried. “Quite so. It was alone before. Hullo, what is this?” The double track turned sharp off and took the direction of King’s Pyland. Homes whistled, and we both followed along after it. His eyes were on the trail, but I happened to look a little to one side, and saw to my surprise the same tracks coming back again in the opposite direction. “One for you, Watson,” said Holmes, when I pointed it out. “You have saved us a long walk, which would have brought us back on our own traces. Let us follow the return track.” We had not to go far. It ended at the paving of asphalt which led up to the gates of the Mapleton stables. As we approached, a groom ran out from them. “We don’t want any loiterers about here,” said he. “I only wished to ask a question,” said Holmes, with his finger and thumb in his waistcoat pocket. “Should I be too early to see your master, Mr. Silas Brown, if I were to call at five o’clock to-morrow morning?” Silver Blaze 29 “Bless you, sir, if any one is about he will be, for he is always the first stirring. But here he is, sir, to answer your questions for himself. No, sir, no; it is as much as my place is worth to let him see me touch your money. Afterwards, if you like.” As Sherlock Holmes replaced the halfcrown which he had drawn from his pocket, a fierce-looking elderly man strode out from the gate with a hunting-crop swinging in his hand. “What’s this, Dawson!” he cried. “No gossiping! Go about your business! And you, what the devil do you want here?” “Ten minutes’ talk with you, my good sir,” said Holmes in the sweetest of voices. “I’ve no time to talk to every gadabout. We want no stranger here. Be off, or you may find a dog at your heels.” Holmes leaned forward and whispered something in the trainer’s ear. He started violently and flushed to the temples. “It’s a lie!” he shouted, “an infernal lie!” “Very good. Shall we argue about it here in public or talk it over in your parlor?” “Oh, come in if you wish to.” Holmes smiled. “I shall not keep you more than a few minutes, Watson,” said he. “Now, Mr. Brown, I am quite at your disposal.” It was twenty minutes, and the reds had all faded into grays before Holmes and the trainer reappeared. Never have I seen such a change as had been brought about in Silas Brown in that short time. His face was ashy pale, beads of perspiration shone upon his 30 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “Be off!” Silver Blaze 31 brow, and his hands shook until the huntingcrop wagged like a branch in the wind. His bullying, overbearing manner was all gone too, and he cringed along at my companion’s side like a dog with its master. “Your instructions will be done. It shall all be done,” said he. “There must be no mistake,” said Holmes, looking round at him. The other winced as he read the menace in his eyes. “Oh no, there shall be no mistake. It shall be there. Should I change it first or not?” Holmes thought a little and then burst out laughing. “No, don’t,” said he; “I shall write to you about it. No tricks, now, or—” “Oh, you can trust me, you can trust me!” “Yes, I think I can. Well, you shall hear from me to-morrow.” He turned upon his heel, disregarding the trembling hand which the other held out to him, and we set off for King’s Pyland. “A more perfect compound of the bully, coward, and sneak than Master Silas Brown I have seldom met with,” remarked Holmes as we trudged along together. “He has the horse, then?” “He tried to bluster out of it, but I described to him so exactly what his actions had been upon that morning that he is convinced that I was watching him. Of course you observed the peculiarly square toes in the impressions, and that his own boots exactly corresponded to them. Again, of course no subordinate would have dared to do such a thing. I described to him how, when according to his 32 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes custom he was the first down, he perceived a strange horse wandering over the moor. How he went out to it, and his astonishment at recognizing, from the white forehead which has given the favorite its name, that chance had put in his power the only horse which could beat the one upon which he had put his money. Then I described how his first impulse had been to lead him back to King’s Pyland, and how the devil had shown him how he could hide the horse until the race was over, and how he had led it back and concealed it at Mapleton. When I told him every detail he gave it up and thought only of saving his own skin.” “But his stables had been searched?” “Oh, an old horse-fakir like him has many a dodge.” “But are you not afraid to leave the horse in his power now, since he has every interest in injuring it?” “My dear fellow, he will guard it as the apple of his eye. He knows that his only hope of mercy is to produce it safe.” “Colonel Ross did not impress me as a man who would be likely to show much mercy in any case.” “The matter does not rest with Colonel Ross. I follow my own methods, and tell as much or as little as I choose. That is the advantage of being unofficial. I don’t know whether you observed it, Watson, but the Colonel’s manner has been just a trifle cavalier to me. I am inclined now to have a little amusement at his expense. Say nothing to Silver Blaze 33 him about the horse.” “Certainly not without your permission.” “And of course this is all quite a minor point compared to the question of who killed John Straker.” “And you will devote yourself to that?” “On the contrary, we both go back to London by the night train.” I was thunderstruck by my friend’s words. We had only been a few hours in Devonshire, and that he should give up an investigation which he had begun so brilliantly was quite incomprehensible to me. Not a word more could I draw from him until we were back at the trainer’s house. The Colonel and the Inspector were awaiting us in the parlor. “My friend and I return to town by the night-express,” said Holmes. “We have had a charming little breath of your beautiful Dartmoor air.” The Inspector opened his eyes, and the Colonel’s lip curled in a sneer. “So you despair of arresting the murderer of poor Straker,” said he. Holmes shrugged his shoulders. “There are certainly grave difficulties in the way,” said he. “I have every hope, however, that your horse will start upon Tuesday, and I beg that you will have your jockey in readiness. Might I ask for a photograph of Mr. John Straker?” The Inspector took one from an envelope and handed it to him. “My dear Gregory, you anticipate all my wants. If I might ask you to wait here for an 34 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes instant, I have a question which I should like to put to the maid.” “I must say that I am rather disappointed in our London consultant,” said Colonel Ross, bluntly, as my friend left the room. “I do not see that we are any further than when he came.” “At least you have his assurance that your horse will run,” said I. “Yes, I have his assurance,” said the Colonel, with a shrug of his shoulders. “I should prefer to have the horse.” I was about to make some reply in defence of my friend when he entered the room again. “Now, gentlemen,” said he, “I am quite ready for Tavistock.” As we stepped into the carriage one of the stable-lads held the door open for us. A sudden idea seemed to occur to Holmes, for he leaned forward and touched the lad upon the sleeve. “You have a few sheep in the paddock,” he said. “Who attends to them?” “I do, sir.” “Have you noticed anything amiss with them of late?” “Well, sir, not of much account; but three of them have gone lame, sir.” I could see that Holmes was extremely pleased, for he chuckled and rubbed his hands together. “A long shot, Watson; a very long shot,” said he, pinching my arm. “Gregory, let me recommend to your attention this singular Silver Blaze 35 Holmes was extremely pleased. 36 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes epidemic among the sheep. Drive on, coachman!” Colonel Ross still wore an expression which showed the poor opinion which he had formed of my companion’s ability, but I saw by the Inspector’s face that his attention had been keenly aroused. “You consider that to be important?” he asked. “Exceedingly so.” “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?” “To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.” “The dog did nothing in the night-time.” “That was the curious incident,” remarked Sherlock Holmes. Four days later Holmes and I were again in the train, bound for Winchester to see the race for the Wessex Cup. Colonel Ross met us by appointment outside the station, and we drove in his drag to the course beyond the town. His face was grave, and his manner was cold in the extreme. “I have seen nothing of my horse,” said he. “I suppose that you would know him when you saw him?” asked Holmes. The Colonel was very angry. “I have been on the turf for twenty years, and never was asked such a question as that before,” said he. “A child would know Silver Blaze, with his white forehead and his mottled off-foreleg.” “How is the betting?” Silver Blaze 37 “Well, that is the curious part of it. You could have got fifteen to one yesterday, but the price has become shorter and shorter, until you can hardly get three to one now.” “Hum!” said Holmes. “Somebody knows something, that is clear.” As the drag drew up in the enclosure near the grand stand I glanced at the card to see the entries. Wessex Plate [it ran] 50 sovs each h ft with 1000 sovs added for four and five year olds. Second, £300. Third, £200. New course (one mile and five furlongs). 1. Mr. Heath Newton’s The Negro. Red cap. Cinnamon jacket. 2. Colonel Wardlaw’s Pugilist. Pink cap. Blue and black jacket. 3. Lord Backwater’s Desborough. Yellow cap and sleeves. 4. Colonel Ross’s Silver Blaze. Black cap. Red jacket. 5. Duke of Balmoral’s Iris. Yellow and black stripes. 6. Lord Singleford’s Rasper. Purple cap. Black sleeves. “We scratched our other one, and put all hopes on your word,” said the Colonel. “Why, what is that? Silver Blaze favorite?” “Five to four against Silver Blaze!” roared the ring. “Five to four against Silver Blaze! Five to fifteen against Desborough! Five to four on the field!” 38 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “There are the numbers up,” I cried. “They are all six there.” “All six there? Then my horse is running,” cried the Colonel in great agitation. “But I don’t see him. My colors have not passed.” “Only five have passed. This must be he.” As I spoke a powerful bay horse swept out from the weighting enclosure and cantered past us, bearing on it back the well-known black and red of the Colonel. “That’s not my horse,” cried the owner. “That beast has not a white hair upon its body. What is this that you have done, Mr. Holmes?” “Well, well, let us see how he gets on,” said my friend, imperturbably. For a few minutes he gazed through my field-glass. “Capital! An excellent start!” he cried suddenly. “There they are, coming round the curve!” From our drag we had a superb view as they came up the straight. The six horses were so close together that a carpet could have covered them, but half way up the yellow of the Mapleton stable showed to the front. Before they reached us, however, Desborough’s bolt was shot, and the Colonel’s horse, coming away with a rush, passed the post a good six lengths before its rival, the Duke of Balmoral’s Iris making a bad third. “It’s my race, anyhow,” gasped the Colonel, passing his hand over his eyes. “I confess that I can make neither head nor tail of it. Don’t you think that you have kept up your mystery long enough, Mr. Holmes?” “Certainly, Colonel, you shall know everything. Let us all go round and have a look at Silver Blaze 39 the horse together. Here he is,” he continued, as we made our way into the weighing enclosure, where only owners and their friends find admittance. “You have only to wash his face and his leg in spirits of wine, and you will find that he is the same old Silver Blaze as ever.” “You take my breath away!” “I found him in the hands of a fakir, and took the liberty of running him just as he was sent over.” “My dear sir, you have done wonders. The horse looks very fit and well. It never went better in its life. I owe you a thousand apologies for having doubted your ability. You have done me a great service by recovering my horse. You would do me a greater still if you could lay your hands on the murderer of John Straker.” “I have done so,” said Holmes quietly. The Colonel and I stared at him in amazement. “You have got him! Where is he, then?” “He is here.” “Here! Where?” “In my company at the present moment.” The Colonel flushed angrily. “I quite recognize that I am under obligations to you, Mr. Holmes,” said he, “but I must regard what you have just said as either a very bad joke or an insult.” Sherlock Holmes laughed. “I assure you that I have not associated you with the crime, Colonel,” said he. “The real murderer is standing immediately behind you.” He stepped past and laid his hand upon the glossy neck of the thoroughbred. 40 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes He laid his hand upon the glossy neck. Silver Blaze 41 “The horse!” cried both the Colonel and myself. “Yes, the horse. And it may lessen his guilt if I say that it was done in self-defence, and that John Straker was a man who was entirely unworthy of your confidence. But there goes the bell, and as I stand to win a little on this next race, I shall defer a lengthy explanation until a more fitting time.” We had the corner of a Pullman car to ourselves that evening as we whirled back to London, and I fancy that the journey was a short one to Colonel Ross as well as to myself, as we listened to our companion’s narrative of the events which had occurred at the Dartmoor training-stables upon the Monday night, and the means by which he had unravelled them. “I confess,” said he, “that any theories which I had formed from the newspaper reports were entirely erroneous. And yet there were indications there, had they not been overlaid by other details which concealed their true import. I went to Devonshire with the conviction that Fitzroy Simpson was the true culprit, although, of course, I saw that the evidence against him was by no means complete. It was while I was in the carriage, just as we reached the trainer’s house, that the immense significance of the curried mutton occurred to me. You may remember that I was distrait, and remained sitting after you had all alighted. I was marvelling in my own mind how I could possibly have overlooked so obvious a clue.” 42 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes “I confess,” said the Colonel, “that even now I cannot see how it helps us.” “It was the first link in my chain of reasoning. Powdered opium is by no means tasteless. The flavor is not disagreeable, but it is perceptible. Were it mixed with any ordinary dish the eater would undoubtedly detect it, and would probably eat no more. A curry was exactly the medium which would disguise this taste. By no possible supposition could this stranger, Fitzroy Simpson, have caused curry to be served in the trainer’s family that night, and it is surely too monstrous a coincidence to suppose that he happened to come along with powdered opium upon the very night when a dish happened to be served which would disguise the flavor. That is unthinkable. Therefore Simpson becomes eliminated from the case, and our attention centers upon Straker and his wife, the only two people who could have chosen curried mutton for supper that night. The opium was added after the dish was set aside for the stable-boy, for the others had the same for supper with no ill effects. Which of them, then, had access to that dish without the maid seeing them? “Before deciding that question I had grasped the significance of the silence of the dog, for one true inference invariably suggests others. The Simpson incident had shown me that a dog was kept in the stables, and yet, though some one had been in and had fetched out a horse, he had not barked enough to arouse the two lads in the loft. Obviously the midnight visitor was some one whom the dog Silver Blaze 43 knew well. “I was already convinced, or almost convinced, that John Straker went down to the stables in the dead of the night and took out Silver Blaze. For what purpose? For a dishonest one, obviously, or why should he drug his own stable-boy? And yet I was at a loss to know why. There have been cases before now where trainers have made sure of great sums of money by laying against their own horses, through agents, and then preventing them from winning by fraud. Sometimes it is a pulling jockey. Sometimes it is some surer and subtler means. What was it here? I hoped that the contents of his pockets might help me to form a conclusion. “And they did so. You cannot have forgotten the singular knife which was found in the dead man’s hand, a knife which certainly no sane man would choose for a weapon. It was, as Dr. Watson told us, a form of knife which is used for the most delicate operations known in surgery. And it was to be used for a delicate operation that night. You must know, with your wide experience of turf matters, Colonel Ross, that it is possible to make a slight nick upon the tendons of a horse’s ham, and to do it subcutaneously, so as to leave absolutely no trace. A horse so treated would develop a slight lameness, which would be put down to a strain in exercise or a touch of rheumatism, but never to foul play.” “Villain! Scoundrel!” cried the Colonel. “We have here the explanation of why John Straker wished to take the horse out on to the 44 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes moor. So spirited a creature would have certainly roused the soundest of sleepers when it felt the prick of the knife. It was absolutely necessary to do it in the open air.” “I have been blind!” cried the Colonel. “Of course that was why he needed the candle, and struck the match.” “Undoubtedly. But in examining his belongings I was fortunate enough to discover not only the method of the crime, but even its motives. As a man of the world, Colonel, you know that men do not carry other people’s bills about in their pockets. We have most of us quite enough to do to settle our own. I at once concluded that Straker was leading a double life, and keeping a second establishment. The nature of the bill showed that there was a lady in the case, and one who had expensive tastes. Liberal as you are with your servants, one can hardly expect that they can buy twenty-guinea walking dresses for their ladies. I questioned Mrs. Straker as to the dress without her knowing it, and having satisfied myself that it had never reached her, I made a note of the milliner’s address, and felt that by calling there with Straker’s photograph I could easily dispose of the mythical Derbyshire. “From that time on all was plain. Straker had led out the horse to a hollow where his light would be invisible. Simpson in his flight had dropped his cravat, and Straker had picked it up—with some idea, perhaps, that he might use it in securing the horse’s leg. Once in the hollow, he had got behind the Silver Blaze 45 horse and had struck a light; but the creature frightened at the sudden glare, and with the strange instinct of animals feeling that some mischief was intended, had lashed out, and the steel shoe had struck Straker full on the forehead. He had already, in spite of the rain, taken off his overcoat in order to do his delicate task, and so, as he fell, his knife gashed his thigh. Do I make it clear?” “Wonderful!” cried the Colonel. “Wonderful! You might have been there!” “My final shot was, I confess a very long one. It struck me that so astute a man as Straker would not undertake this delicate tendon-nicking without a little practice. What could he practice on? My eyes fell upon the sheep, and I asked a question which, rather to my surprise, showed that my surmise was correct. “When I returned to London I called upon the milliner, who had recognized Straker as an excellent customer of the name of Derbyshire, who had a very dashing wife, with a strong partiality for expensive dresses. I have no doubt that this woman had plunged him over head and ears in debt, and so led him into this miserable plot.” “You have explained all but one thing,” cried the Colonel. “Where was the horse?” “Ah, it bolted, and was cared for by one of your neighbors. We must have an amnesty in that direction, I think. This is Clapham Junction, if I am not mistaken, and we shall be in Victoria in less than ten minutes. If you care to smoke a cigar in our rooms, Colonel, I shall 46 Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes be happy to give you any other details which might interest you.”

 

和訳

「ワトソン君、僕は行《ゆ》かなきゃならないんだがね」
ある朝、一緒に食事をしている時にホームズがいった。
「行くってどこへ?」
「ダートムアだ――キングス・パイランドだ」
私は格別おどろきもしなかった。事実、私は、今全イングランドの噂の種になっているこの驚くべき事件に、ホームズが関係しないということをむしろ不思議にさえ思っていたのである。前の日、ホームズは終日眉根をよせた顔を首垂《うなだ》れて、強い黒煙草をパイプにつめかえつめかえ部屋の中を歩き廻ってばかりいて、私が何を話しかけても何を訊ねても石のように黙りこくっていた。あらゆる新聞の新らしい版が出るごとに、いちいち配達所から届けられたが、それすらちょっと眼を通すだけですぐに部屋の隅へ投げすてた。しかも、彼が一言も口をきかないにも拘らず、彼の頭脳《あたま》の中で考えられていることは、私にはよく分っていた。いま彼の推理力と太刀打ちの出来る問題といえばただ一つ、ウェセックス賞杯《カップ》争覇戦出場の名馬の奇怪なる失踪と、その調馬師の惨殺された事件があるのみだ。だから彼が突然、その悲劇の現場《げんじょう》へ行くといい出したことは、私にとっては予期していたことでありまた希望していたことでもあったのだ。
「差支えがなければ僕も行ってみたいんだがね」と、私はいった。
「君に来てもらえれば大変有難いんだが。この事件は極めて特異なものだと思われる節があるから、君にしたって行くことはまんざらむだにはなるまいと思う。今からパディントン停車場へ行けば、ちょうど汽車の時間にいいだろう。委《くわ》しいことは途々《みちみち》話すとして、すまないが君のあの上等の双眼鏡を持って来てくれたまえ」
それから一時間あまりの後には、私はエクスタ行の一等車の一隅に腰かけていた。シャーロック・ホームズは耳垂れつきの旅行用ハンチングを被った顔を緊張させて、パディントンで新らたに買った新聞に忙しそうに眼を通していた。そしてリイディングをずっと過ぎた頃、彼はそれ等の新聞をまとめて座席の下へ突込み、シガー・ケースを取出して私にもすすめた。
「至極順調に走ってるようだね」
ホームズは窓の外を眺めながらそういった。そして時計を出して見て、
「今ちょうど速力は一時間五十三|哩《まいる》半だ」
「四分の一哩標が見えなかったようだが」
と、私はいった。
「僕はそんなものは見やしないよ、だが、この線路の電柱は六十ヤードごとに立ってるのだから計算は極めて簡単に出来るんだ。ところで、ジョン・ストレーカ殺しと白銀号《しろがねごう》失踪事件については、もう十分知ってるんだろうね?」
「テレグラフ紙とクロニクル紙との記事は読んだ」
「この事件も探究の方法としては、新らしい証拠を求めるよりも、既に知れている些末な事実を分析し淘汰して行く方が、賢い方法かも知れぬ。今度の事件は非常に珍らしい事件で巧妙に行われ、その上多大の人々に重大な関係を持ってるものだから、いろいろと揣摩臆説が行われるんで困らされてるんだが、要するに問題は事実の骨組を、絶対に動かすべからざる事実の骨組を、諸説紛々たる報道の中から掴み出せばいいんだ。そして、それが出来たら、そのしっかりとした根底の上に立って、そこからいかなる推論が出て来るか、事件の秘密はどの点にかかっているかということを発見するのが我々の役目だ。僕は火曜日の晩に、馬の持主のロス大佐と事件担当のグレゴリ警部との両方から、来て一緒に調べてくれという依頼の電報を受け取ったんだ」
「火曜日の晩に?」私は叫んだ。「今日は木曜日じゃないか。何んだって昨日のうちに行かなかったんだい?」
「僕がどじを踏んだんだよ君、そうした失敗は、君の記録によってのみ僕を知る人々が考えているよりもはるかにちょいちょい僕にはあるんだよ。こういうわけさ、――イングランド一流の名馬がそう長く行方の知れないわけがない、殊にダートムアの北部のような人口の稀れな地方にあっては、そんなことはあり得ないと考えたんだ。だから、昨日は、今に馬盗人が知れた、そしてストレーカ殺しもその馬盗人と同一人だったと知らせて来るかと、そればかり待ち暮したんだよ、しかし、また一日が空しくすぎて、今朝になってみると、フィツロイ・シンプソンという青年が捕まったきりで、事が少しも捗らないようだから、いよいよ自分の出場《でば》が来たと思ったんだ。とはいっても、昨日だって決して空費したわけではないがね」
「じゃ、見込でもついたのかね?」
「少くとも事件の主要な事実だけは掴んだ。それを君に話してきかそう。他人に事件の経緯《いきさつ》を話してきかせるくらい自分の考えをはっきりさせ得ることはないのだし、それに事件をよく知ってもらって、どこから手をつけるべきかを話しておかないと、君にしても助力のしようがあるまいからね」
私はクッションに身を埋《うず》めて葉巻を吹かしながら、ホームズが身体を前へ乗り出して、要点ごとに細長い人差指で左の掌を叩き、事件の大体を話すのをきくのであった。
「白銀号というのはアイソノミ系の馬だが、祖先の名を恥かしめぬ立派な記録を持っている。今は五歳で競馬のあるたびに賞品をみんな攫って来るんで、持主のロス大佐は非常にうまくやってるわけだ。現に今度の事件の起るまで、白銀号といえばウェセクス賞杯《しょうはい》争覇戦第一の人気馬で、賭もほかの馬に対して三対一という割合だった。それほど競馬界切っての人気をつづけて来ながら、まだ一度もその贔負に失望を与えたことがないものだから、少々ぐらい賭金は高くても、依然として白銀号には莫大な金が賭けられるというわけなんだ。だから、この火曜日の決戦に白銀号が出られなくするということは、多くの人々に非常な利害関係を持つことになる。
この事実は、むろん大佐の調馬場のあるキングス・パイランドではよく心得ていた、調馬師のジョン・ストレーカという男はもと騎手で、ロス大佐の騎手をやっていたが、体重が重くなったので止めたんだ。騎手として五年、調馬師として七年大佐に仕えているが、その間いつも熱心で正直な男としてつとめて来た、規模の小さな調馬場で、馬が四頭しかいなかったから、ストレーカの下に三人の若い者がいるだけで、そのうちの一人が毎晩|厩舎《うまや》に寝ずの番をし、あとの二人は厩舎の二階に寝ることになっていた。三人とも至極性質のよい若者だ。ストレーカには妻があって、厩舎から二百ヤードばかりはなれたところにある小さな家《うち》に住んでいた。子供はないが女中を一人おいて気楽に暮していた。この附近は極めて淋しいところで、だだ半哩ばかり北の方に、タヴィストック市のある請負師が、病人や、ダートムアの新鮮な空気を楽しみたいという人達をあてこんで建てた別荘風の家が一かたまりあるだけだ。タヴィストックへは西へ二哩ばかりあり、荒地《あれち》を越して二哩ばかり行くと、ケープルトンにはかなり大きな調馬場がある。これはバックウォータ卿の所有で、サイラス・ブラウンという男が管理している。そのほかどっちを見ても、荒地は全く人気《ひとげ》というものがなく、ただわずかに漂白《さすらい》のジプシーが二三いるくらいのものだ。これが日曜の晩に事件が起るまでの大体の状況だ。
当夜はいつもの通り馬を運動させて、水をやった上九時に厩舎の戸を閉めて戸締りをした。そして三人の若い者のうち二人は台所で夕飯を食べに調馬師の家まで歩いて行くし、あとの一人ネッド・ハンタだけは厩舎に残って番をしていた、すると、女中のエディス・バクスタが九時ちょっとすぎに、羊のカレ料理の夕飯を運んで来てくれたが、それには飲みものは何も添えてなかった。仕事中は水以外の飲みものは飲んでならないことになっていたし、水なら厩舎にいくらでも出る栓があるからだ。非常に暗い晩だったので、それに途中は淋しい荒地だったので女中は提灯を持っていた。
女中のエディス・バクスタは厩舎から三十ヤードばかりのところまで来ると、暗がりの中から不意に声をかけて一人の男が現われて来た。提灯の投げる丸い光の圏内まで来たのを見ると、鼠色のスコッチの服を着て羅紗のハンチングを被った紳士風の男で、ゲートルをつけて、握りの玉になってる太いステッキを持っていたという。が、エディスが特に印象づけられたのは、顔色がひどく蒼ざめて、何んとなく挙動のそわそわしてることだった。年は三十をちょっとすぎたくらいだったという。
「一体ここはどこなんですか?」
と男は訊ねた。
「仕方がないからこの荒野で野宿をしようと決心してるところへ、お前さんの灯が見えたんでホッとしたわけですよ」
「ここはキングス・パイランド調馬場のすぐ側《わき》です」
「おお、そうだったか! それはまあ何んという仕合せなことだろう! ふむ、毎晩一人ずつ厩舎で寝るんだと見えるな。それでいまお前さんが夕飯を持って行って来たんだな。ところでお前さん、新らしい着物が一重ね拵えられるお金の儲かる話があるんだが、嫌だなんて見栄を張るお前さんじゃありますまいね?」男はチョッキのポケットから折りたたんだ白い紙を取出して、「これを今晩の中《うち》に厩番《うまやばん》に手渡してくれれば、お前さんは飛切|上等《じょうら》の晴着が手に入るんだがね」
「女中がこの男の様子があんまり真剣だったので恐くなって、すりぬけるようにしていつも食事を渡すことになってる厩舎の窓のところへ駈けて行った。と、ハンタはもう窓を開けて、小さなテーブルに向って食事をしていた。ネッド実はいまこれこれだと話しかけてると、そこへまたも先刻《さっき》の男が追っかけて来た。
「今晩は」男は窓から中を覗き込みながら、「実はお前さんに少々話したいことがあるんですがね」とハンタに声をかけたが、その時に手に握っていた小さな紙包の端がチラッと見えたと、後で女中は断言している。
「何用で来なすったのかね?」ハンタは反問した。
「お前さんの儲かる耳よりな話なんだがね。ここにはウェセクス賞杯戦に出る馬が二頭いる――白銀と栗毛と――お前さん確実な予想を教えてくれませんかね、決して悪いようにはしないが。重量の点で、栗毛は八分の五哩で白銀に百ヤードは分があるというんで、馬主筋はみんな栗毛に賭けたというが本当かね?」
「うむ、さては手前は馬の様子を探りに来たスパイだな? よしッ! キングス・パイランドではスパイをどう扱うか見せてやろう」とハンタは叫んで、犬を放しに走った。女中はそのまま家の方へ駈け戻ったが、走りながら振返ってみると、その男は窓から中へ半身を乗り入れるようにしていたという。けれどもそれから一分間後に、ハンタが犬をつれて外へ飛び出して見た時には、もうその男はいなかったので、厩舎のまわりを駈けずりまわって探してみたが、どこにも姿は見えなかった。」[#「」」は底本では欠落]
「ちょっと」
私はホームズを遮った。
「ハンタは犬をつれて飛び出した時、厩舎の戸締りをしないでおったのかい?」
「素敵! 素敵だ! その点が非常に大切だと思ったから、僕は昨日ダートムアへ電報を打って訊ねてみた。ハンタは出る時鍵をかけたそうだ。そして窓は、人間の入れるほどの大きさはないという。
ハンタは仲間が食事から帰って来るのを待って、親方の調馬師に事の次第を報告に出かけた。ストレーカはそれをきくとひどく昂奮して、それが何を意味するか分らなかったらしいが、漠然たる不安を感じたらしかった。そして夜の一時に細君がふと眼を覚ましてみると、服を着かけていたという。細君が驚いてその理由《わけ》を訊ねると、馬のことが心配になって眠れないから、厩舎に間違いでもないかを見に行くつもりだという。ちょうど雨が窓を打つ音をきいたので、細君はどうぞ家《うち》にいてくれと願ったが、泣かんばかりに願ったが肯《きき》入れないで、大きな雨外套に身を包んでそのまま出ていってしまった。
細君が翌朝眼を覚ましたのは七時だった。が、その時はまだストレーカは帰っていなかった。そこで細君は急いで着物を着て、女中を呼んで一緒に厩舎まで行ってみた。すると、厩舎の戸は開け放しになっていて、中にはハンタが椅子にうずくまって深い深い眠りに落ちているばかりで、白銀の厩舎は藻抜けの殻で、ストレーカの姿も見えなかった。
馬具部屋の二階の乾草の中に眠っている二人の若い者をすぐに呼び起したが、二人とも寝ぼすけな性質《たち》なので、夜中に何もきかなかったという。ハンタはむろん強い薬品のために眠っているのに違いなかった。ゆり起してみたが、全く正体なく眠っているので、それはそのままにしておいて、二人の若者と二人の女とで、ストレーカと白銀とを探しに[#「に」は底本では「た」]飛び出して行った。というのは、ストレーカが何かの理由で朝早くから白銀を運動させにつれて行ったものだろうと思われたから。だが、厩舎の傍の低い丘へかけ上ってみると、そこからは八方の荒地《あれち》が見渡せるが、どっちを見ても名馬の影すら見えないばかりか、何か不吉なことが起ったんだなという予感を起させられたのだった。
厩舎から四分の一哩ばかりのところのはりえにしだ[#「はりえにしだ」に傍点]の藪にストレーカの外套が引っかかっていた。そしてすぐその先に鉢形の凹《くぼ》みがあって、その底に不幸な調馬師の死体が発見された。何か重い兇器でやられたらしく、頭蓋骨は粉砕され、腿にも傷があった。腿の傷は極めて鋭い兇器でやられたらしく、長く鮮かに切られていた。ストレーカ自身もよほど烈しく抵抗したものと見え、右の手には柄元までべっとり血のついた小さなナイフをしっかりと握り、左の手には赤と黒との絹の襟飾《ネクタイ》を掴んでいた。この襟飾《ネクタイ》は、前夜厩舎へ来た見知らぬ男のつけていたものに間違いないと女中が申し立てた。
昏睡からさめたハンタも、この襟飾《ネクタイ》の持主に関しては同様のことを証言した。そして自分がこんなに眠ったのも、あの男が窓の外に立ってる時、羊のカレー料理に薬を混ぜたのに相違ないと力んだ。
失踪した名馬に関しては、ストレーカの格闘中その辺にいたものと見え、死の凹みの附近に無数の足跡があったが、それ以来全く行方不明で、莫大な賞金もかけられたことだし、ダートムアのジプシーどもがしきりに目を配ってもいるのだが、全然知れない、最後に、ハンタの食べ残した夕食を分析してみると、その中には阿片末がかなり多量に混入していることが分った。しかも、同夜同じものを食べた他の人々には少しも別条がなかった。以上がすべての臆説を排除し、出来るだけ粉飾を加えないで述べた事件の骨子だ。今度は警察がこの事件をどう取扱ってるか、その要点だけをいってみよう。
この事件を担当させられたグレゴリ警部は、極めて敏腕な人物だ。もう少し想像力さえあったら、この方面で非常に出世し得る人だと思う。警部は現場へ出張すると、すぐ当然嫌疑のかかってある男を発見して引捕まえた。その男は附近では広く知られていたから、探し出すのは何んの困難もなかった。フィッロイ・シムソンという名前だ。立派な生れで立派な教育のある男なんだが、競馬ですっかり失敗して、今ではロンドンのスポート倶楽部で、内々小さな賭事の胴元をやって暮してるということだ。持っていた賭帳を調べてみると、白銀の競走馬に五千ポンドも自分で賭けていたという。
捕われた時彼は、実はキングス・パイランドの白銀と栗毛や、ケープルトンの厩舎でサイラス・ブラウンが管理している第二の人気者デスボロについて何か予想材料を得たいと思ってわざわざダートムアまで出かけて来たんだと、自分から進んで述べた。そして前夜、前にいったような行動をとったことも否定はしなかったが、それについては他意あったわけではなく、ただ確実な材料を掴みたかったからそうしたまでだといい切った。そこでストレーカの掴んでいた襟飾《ネクタイ》を見せると、さっと顔色を変えたが、なぜそれが被害者の手にあったかということは、一言もいい開きはし得なかった、服のぬれていることは、前夜あらしに屋外にいたことを語っているし、ステッキはピナン島産の棕梠《しゅろ》製で、鉛を入れて重みがつけてあって、何度も乱打すればストレーカの受けてるような傷を与えるに十分な兇器となり得るものだった。
「しかるに、ストレーカのナイフにあのように血のついてるところを見れば、加害者は一人ではなかったにしても、少くともその中の誰かは切られていなければならないはずだのに、シムソンの身体には少しも傷がない。これで話の概略は終ったわけだが、何か君の気付いた点をいってもらえれば大変有難いのだが―」
ホームズが独特の明快さで語る一語一語を、私は異常な熱心さで傾聴した。その事実の大部分は既に私の承知していることであったが、どれが重大であるのか、またどれがどこへ関係を持つのかよくは分らなかった。
「ストレーカの傷は、頭をやられて痙攣的に藻掻いている中《うち》に、自分のナイフでやったんじゃないだろうか?」
私は一説をいってみた。
「有り得ないことではないね。あるいはそんなことかもしれぬ。そうだとすれば、シムソンに有利な材料が一つだけなくなるわけだ」
「それにしても、警察ではどんな見込を立てているか、今からだけれどどうも分りかねるね」
「警察の見込なんかどうせ我々の考えることとは大《おおい》に違うにきまってるんだよ。それはおそらくこうだと思う。フィッロイ・シムソンは厩番を薬で眠らせ、どうかして合鍵を手に入れて、誘拐し去る目的で馬をつれ出した。手綱の見えなくなっているのは、シムソンが使ったからだ。厩舎の戸を開け放しにしたままシムソンは荒地《あれち》の方へ馬をつれ出していったが、その途中で調馬師に出会ったか、または追いつかれた。そこですぐ争いになり、シムソンは太いステッキでストレーカの頭を叩き潰したが、小さなナイフを持って立向って来たストレーカからは、擦傷一つ受けなかった。馬はシムソンが首尾よく秘密の隠し場所へかくしてしまったか、さもなくば二人の男の闘争中勝手に逸走したまま、いまなお荒地のどこかをうろついてるのかもしれない――警察の考え方はおそらくこんなことだろう。これでは一向得心のゆく解釈とはいえないが、といって外の解釈はこれよりまだまだ信じられない。とにかく、現場へ着いたらすぐに調べてみることにしようが、それまでのところはまずこれ以上どう考えてみようもない」
タヴィストックの小さな市《まち》へ着いたのはもう夕方であった。タヴィストックはまるで楯の中央の突起のように、ダートムアの荒漠たる土地の中央にぽつんと存在する小さな市《まち》である。着いてみると、二人の紳士が停車場まで迎えに来ていた。一人は背の高い色の白い人で、獅子のような頭髪と顎髭とを持ち、明るい青色の眼には妙に射るような光があった。もう一人は小柄できびきびした人で、フロックにゲートルというきちんとした身装《みなり》で、短く刈込んだ頬髯を持ち眼鏡をかけていた。前者は、近頃英国探偵界にメキメキ男をあげて来たグレゴリ警部、後者は運動家として有名なロス大佐である。
「ホームズさん、あなたの御出張を得ましたことは欣快の至りです」
大佐が挨拶をした。
「ここにおいでの警部殿も出来るだけの手をつくして下すっていますが、気の毒なストレーカの復讐のため、かつは馬を取戻すためには草の根を分け石を起し、あらゆることをやってみたいと思って、それであなたの御出張をお願いいたした次第です」
「その後何か新発見でもおありでしたか?」
ホームズが訊ねた。
「残念ながらほとんど進展してはいません」
警部が引取って答えた。
「出口に無蓋馬車の用意をして来ましたから、暗くならない中《うち》に、何より先きに現場をごらんになりたいでしょうから、委しいことは馬車の中で申し上げることにしましょう」
一分間の後、私たちは乗心地のよい回転馬車《ランドウ》に座を占めて、見馴れぬ古風なデヴォンシャの市を駆《かけ》らせていた。グレゴリ警部は今度の事件で胸一杯だったと見え、話は後から後へと迸り出た。それに対してホームズは時々質問や間投詞を挟んだ。ロス大佐は腕を拱《こまね》いて反身《そりみ》に座席に身をもたせて、帽子を眼のあたりまですべらせ黙々として耳を傾けていた。私は二人の探偵の対話をいと興味深く聴いていた。グレゴリは自分の意見をも述べていたが、それは来がけの汽車の中でいったホームズの言葉とほとんど変らなかった。
「フィツロイ・シムソンはそういうわけで、四囲の状況が非常に不利なわけです。私一個としても彼が犯人であることを信じています。同時に、その証拠が全く情況証拠ばかりですから、何か新事実が現われればいつでもこの嫌疑は覆えされるものであるということも認めなければなりませんが」
「ストレーカのナイフについてのお考えは?」
「あれはストレーカが倒れる時、自分で自分を傷つけたための血痕だと決定しました。」
「ワトソン君も来る途中で、そうじゃないかしらといっていましたが、それが事実だとすると、シムソンにとっては不利な材料になるわけですね」
「その通りです。シムソンはナイフも持っていなければ、身体に傷一つなかったです。彼に対しては極めて有力な不利な証拠があります。第一に白銀の消失は彼に莫大な利益をもたらします。彼には厩番のハンタに薬を盛った嫌疑があります。同夜雨が降り出してから屋外にいたことも争われぬ事実です。兇器としては太いステッキを持っていました。そして最後に、死人が彼の襟飾《ネクタイ》を掴んでいました。これだけ材料があれば、十分陪審員たちを承伏させることが出来るに違いありません」
ホームズは首を傾げて、
「上手な弁護士にかかったらそれくらいのことは難なく論破されてしまうでしょうね。シムソンはなぜ白銀を厩舎の外へつれ出さなければならなかったんですか? 傷つけて競馬に出られなくしたければ厩舎の中でも出来ることじゃないですか? 捕えられた時、厩舎の合鍵を持っていましたか? 阿片末を売り渡したのはどこの薬種商です? とりわけ土地不案内なシムソンが、馬のような大きなものを、しかもこうした有名な馬をどこへかくせるというんです? 上手な弁護士ならこれ等の点を捕えて、巧みに論破してしまうでしょう。シムソンは女中に頼んで厩舎に届けさせようとした紙片《かみきれ》を何んだといってるんですか?」
「十ポンドの紙幣だったといっています。そういえばポケットの中へ十ポンドの紙幣を一枚持っていました。しかし、あなたの仰しゃった反駁はそう有力なものとも思われませんね。シムソンは土地不案内の者じゃないです。夏時分二度、タヴィストックに泊っていたことがあります。阿片はおそらくロンドンから持って来たものでしょう。合鍵は目的を達した上は、どこへかすててしまったものと考えられます。馬はどこか荒地《あれち》の中の凹みか、廃坑の中に殺されているかもしれません」
「襟飾《ネクタイ》のことはどう弁明していますか?」
「自分のものには相違ないけれど、遺失したのだといっています。しかし、シムソンが馬をつれ出したのだという新らしい事実が一つ発見されています」
ホームズは急に聞耳を立てた。「[#「「」は底本では一文後にある]兇行のあった月曜の夜。兇行の演じられた場所から一哩と離れないところでジプシーの一群がキャンプした跡を発見しました。月曜日に彼等は天幕を張って、火曜日に出発してしまったのです。そこで、ジプシーとシムソンとの間にある了解があったものとすると、シムソンはジプシーのいるところまで馬をつれて行く途中をストレーカに追いつかれた、で、馬はいまジプシー達の手にあるのだと考えられなくもありますまい?」
「たしかに有り得ないことではありませんね」
「いまこのジプシーの行方を尋ねて荒地を捜索中です。同時にタヴィストックを中心に、十哩の円を描いてその中にある厩という厩、小舎という小舎をことごとく調べました」
「すぐ附近にも一つ調馬場があるということでしたね?」
「あります。その調馬場も見逃してはならないものの一つです。そこにいるデスボロという馬は第二の人気馬なんですから、白銀が失踪すれば非常な利益を得るわけです。そこの調馬師のサイラス・ブラウンという男は自分の方の馬に大金を賭けているということですが、死んだストレーカとも仲がよくなかったともいいます。で、一応その厩舎をも調べてはみましたが、この事件に関係のありそうなものは何一つ見付かりませんでした。」
「そのケープルトンの調馬師の利害とシムソンと何か関係はないんですか?」
「全然ありません」
ホームズは後方へ寄りかかった。そして話はそれ切りきれてしまった。その間も馬車はとめどなく駈けていたが、まもなく道路に面して立っている軒の長くつき出た小じんまりとした赤煉瓦の別荘風の家の前へ停められた。少し離れて調馬場があり、その向うには灰色の屋根を持った建物――厩舎が見えていた。どっちを見ても枯れ羊歯で、ブロンズに色づけられた荒地《こうち》がゆるやかな起伏をなして地平線の果てまでつづき、眼を遮ぎるものとてはただタヴィストックの教会の尖塔と、ケープルトンの調馬場だけだという家々が遥か西の方に群がっているのみである。私達は馬車から飛び降りたが、ホームズだけは依然として前方の空を見つめたまま降りようともせず、座席に身を埋《うず》めてじっと深く瞑想に耽っていた。私が腕をゆすぶって注意すると、やっと気がついて慌てて飛び降りて、
「御免下さい」
と、呆気にとられて顔を見つめていたロス大佐に向って、
「白昼夢を見ていたもんですからつい」
と弁解したが、その眼には一種の輝きを帯び、その態度には昂奮が見えた。彼の性癖をよく知っている私には、それを見て、たしかにある手懸りを得たのだということが分った。ただし、その手懸りが果して何んであるかはさっぱり見当はつかなかったけれど。
「ホームズさん、すぐに兇行の現場へいらっしゃるんでしょうね?」
グレゴリ警部が訊ねた。
「いや、それよりもしばらくここにいて二三の細目について訊ねたいと思います。ストレーカの死体はいったんここへつれて帰ったんでしょうね?」
「そうです。まだ二階に置いてあります。検死は明白ですから」
「ストレーカは永年あなたのところに働いていたんですか、ロスさん?」
「はい、いつもよく働いてくれました」
「警部さん、ストレーカの死体のポケットに何が入っていたか、お調べだったでしょうね?」
「ごらんになるなら居間の方に全部まとめてありますから」
「ぜひ見せていただきたいものです」
[#空白は底本では「「」]私達一同は表の間へ通って、中央のテーブルを囲んでそれぞれ席についた。すると、グレゴリ警部は四角い小さなブリキの函《はこ》を取出し、鍵で蓋をとっていろいろな品物を私達の前へ並べてみせた。蝋マッチが一箱、二|吋《インチ》ほどの獣脂蝋燭が一つ、A・D・印のブライヤのパイプに長刻みのカヴェンデッシュ煙草を半オンスばかりつめた海豹《いるか》皮の煙草入れ、金鎖のついた銀時計、金貨で五ソヴリン、アルミニュウムの鉛筆さし、書附二三通、『ロンドン、ワイス会社製』と刻印された非常に細く鋭い、それでいて曲りにくい刄を持った象牙柄のナイフが一つ。[#「。」は底本では「」」]
「これは非常に変ったナイフだ」
ホームズはナイフをとり上げて、うら返してじっと見ながらいった。
「血がついているようですが、ストレーカが握っていたというのはこれなんですか? ワトソン君、このナイフはむしろ君の領分らしいね」
「これは医者の方で白内障《そこひ》メスという奴だ」
「そうだと思った。極めて緻密な仕事をするために、極めて尖鋭に作られているんだ。荒っぽい仕事をしに出て行った男が、こんなものを持っていたというのは不思議ですね。殊にポケットにかくすわけにもゆかないこんなものを」
「現に死体の傍に落ちていましたが、刄の先はコルクを当ててあったんです」
警部がいった。
「妻君の話では、このナイフは前から化粧台の上に置いてあったのを、出がけにストレーカが握って行ったんだということです。護身用としても、攻撃用としても貧弱なことは貧弱ですが、その時手近にあったもののうちでは、これが一番よかったんでしょう」
「そんなことでしょうね。この書附はどうですか?」
「その中《うち》三枚は乾草商人の清算書で、受取済になっています。一つはロス大佐からの命令の手紙で、もう一枚残っているのはロンドンのボンド街のマダム・ルスリエという帽飾店から、ウィリアム・ダービシャ宛に出した、合計三十七ポンド十五シルの勘定書です。ストレーカの妻君の話によれば、ダーヴィシャというのは夫の友達で、ここへもちょいちょいダーヴィシャ宛に手紙が来たということです」
「ダーヴィシャ夫人の帽子だとすると、夫人はなかなか贅沢家だな」
と、ホームズは勘定書を眺めながらいった。
「一枚の着物に二十二ギンもかけるとは、ちと奢りすぎる。しかし、これでここはもう済んだようですから、今度は兇行の現場を見せてもらいましょうか」
居間からどやどやと出て行くと、廊下に一人の婦人が待ち構えていたのがつかつかと進んで来てグレゴリ警部の腕に手をかけた。憔悴し切った顔に焦慮しているらしい胸の中《うち》をそのまま現わして、まだおどおどと恐ろしそうにしている。
「あの、捕まったんですか?」
「いや、まだですよ奥さん。しかし、このホームズさんがロンドンからわざわざ加勢に来て下さいましたから、一同で出来るだけはやってみるつもりです」
「ああ、あなたにはいつぞやプリマスで園遊会の時お目にかかりましたね、ストレーカさん」
と、ホームズはいった。
「さあ、いいえ、それは何かのお間違いでございましょう」
「おや、そうですかいやいやたしかにお目にかかりましたよ。あの時あなたは鳩色絹の服に駝鳥の羽根の飾りをつけて、来ていらしったじゃありませんか」
「いいえ、私はそんな服はもってはおりません」
「ああ、それでは間違いでした」
ホームズはちょっと失礼を詑びて、警部を追って外へ出た。荒地《あれち》を通って少しばかり行くと、死体のあったという凹みへ出た。凹みの縁《へり》にははりえにしだ[#「はりえにしだ」に傍点]の藪が繁っていた。そこへストレーカの外套はかかっていたのである。
「その晩は風はありませんでしたね?」
ホームズは訊ねた。
「風はちっともありませんでしたが、雨はどしゃ降りでした」
「そうすると、外套は風に吹き上げられたんじゃなくて、誰かがそこへおいたんだということになりますね」
「そうです。灌木の上へちゃんとのせておいたものです」
「ふむ、面白いですね。地面はひどく踏みにじられているようですが、兇行以来いろんな人が歩き廻ったんでしょうね?」
「いいえ、ここんところへ莚《むしろ》を敷いて、みんなその上にいることにしました」
「そいつはよかったです」
「この鞄の中にストレーカの穿いていた靴を片っ方と、フィツロイ・シムソンのを一つと、それから白銀の蹄鉄の型を一つ持って来ました」
「ほう! それあ大出来でしたな、グレゴリさん!」
ホームズは鞄を受取って凹みの底へ降りて行き、莚を真中の方へやってその上に腹這いになり、両手に顎をのせて眼の前の踏みにじられた泥を注意深く研究していたが、突然、
「や、や、これは何んだ?」
と叫んだ。
ホームズの発見したものは泥がついて、ちょっと見ると小さな木の枝か何かのように見えたが、蝋マッチの半分ばかり燃え残ったものであった。
「はて、どうして私はそんなものを見落しましたかな」
と、警部は少し苦い顔をした。
「泥に埋《うず》もれていたから分らなかったんですよ、私はこいつを探すつもりでいたから見つかったんです」
「えッ! 初めからあるものと思って探しにかかったんですか?」
「あってもいいはずだと思ったんです」
ホームズは鞄から靴を出して、それを泥の上の型に一つ一つ合せてみた。それから凹みの縁《ふち》へ上って来て、羊歯や灌木の間をうろうろと這い廻った。
「もう何んにもありゃしますまいよ」
警部はその後姿を眼で追いながらいった。
「百ヤード四方は私が念入りに調べてみたんですからな」
「ですがね」
ホームズは起き上って、
「あなたがそうまで仰しゃるのを探し廻るのは失礼ですから止めましょう。その代り日が暮れるまでこの荒地《あれち》を少し散歩してみたいと思います。そうすれば明日の調べには地理が分って好都合ですから。それからこの蹄鉄は幸運のお呪《まじな》いにポケットへ入れて行きましょう」
ロス大佐はさっきから、ホームズの組織的な調べ方にあきあきしていたらしく、この時時計を出してみていった。
「警部さんは私と一緒にお帰りを願いたいですな。あなたに御相談願いたいことがいろいろありますから。そして白銀の名を今度の競馬から取除いてもらうことが、公衆に対する義務ではないかと思うもんですからな」
「その必要は絶対にありません」
ホームズが傍からはっきりといい切った。
「名前をそのままにしておくだけのことは必ず私がして上げます」
大佐は一礼して、
「そのお言葉を承わるのは非常に欣快です。私達はストレーカの家でお待ちしますから、散歩がおすみでしたらお帰り下さい。御一緒にタヴィストックへ馬車で帰りましょう」
大佐はグレゴリ警部と共に去り、ホームズと私とは荒地《あれち》の中を静かに歩いていた。太陽はケープルトン調馬場の彼方に沈みかけて、眼前のゆるやかな傾斜を持つ平原は金色《きんしょく》に染まり、枯れ羊歯や茨のある部分は濃いばら色がかった褐色に燃えた。が、深い思索に耽っているホームズにとっては、それ等の光景は何んでもなかった。
「我々のとるべき道はだね、ワトソン君」
しばらくして彼はいい出した。
「ジョン・ストレーカは誰が殺したかの問題はしばらく措いて、馬はどうなったかを専ら考えてみよう。いま、馬は、ストレーカが殺されているうちまたは殺された後で逸走したものとすると、一体どこに逃げるだろう? 馬というものは非常に群集性の強い動物だ、だから、もし自由に放り出しておいたら本能的にキングス・パイランドへ帰るか、ケープルトンへ行くかするに違いない。どうしてこの荒地《あれち》をうろついているものか! それだったら今までにちゃんと発見されているに決まっている。また、ジプシーがどうして馬を誘拐するものか、[#「、」は底本では欠落]ジプシーというものは警察にいじめられるのを厭うから、何か事が起ったときけばすぐにその場所を引き払うものだ。あんな名馬は売ろうたって売れもしない。だから馬をつれて逃げるなんてことは、非常な危険があるばかりで、何等利益がない。これは間違いのないところだ」
「じゃ一体どこにいるんだろう?」
「いまいった通り、キングス・パイランドへ帰ったか、ケープルトンへ行ったに違いない。しかるにキングス・パイランドへは帰っていないんだからケープルトンへ行ったものに違いない。これを差当り実行的仮定として、それがどういうことになるか、研究してみよう。荒地《あれち》のうちでもこの辺は警部もいってるように極めて土地が固くて乾燥しているけれども、ケープルトンの方へ行くに従って低くなっていて、見たまえ、あそこに細長く凹《くぼ》んだところがある。あの辺は兇行のあった月曜日の晩には、非常にぐしょぐしょだったに違いない。もし我々の想像が当ってるなら、馬はあそこを通っているはずだから、あそここそ足跡が残っている場所でなければならない。」
ホームズがこう話す間、私達はすたすたとその方へ歩いて行ったが、二三分で問題の凹みのところまで来た。ホームズの要求によって私はその凹みの縁《ふち》を右の方へ辿って行き、ホームズ自身は左の方へ行った。が、五十歩と歩かぬうちにホームズが急に声を挙げたので振り返ってみると、来い来いをやってるので、行ってみると、そこの軟らかい土の上に馬蹄の跡が判然といくつもついていた。ホームズがポケットから蹄鉄を出して当てがってみると、それがぴったり符合した。
「想像力の有難味が分るだろう? グレゴリにはこの素質だけが欠けているんだ。我々が想像力を働かして事件を仮定し、その仮定に従って取調べの歩を進めた結果、その仮定の正しかったことを確めたんだ。さ、行ってみよう」
私達はじめじめした凹地を越えて、乾いて固い草土を四分の一哩ばかり歩いて行った。と、再び土地の傾斜しているところがあり、そこにも馬蹄の跡があった。また半哩ばかり何んにもなくて、ケープルトンにかなり近くなってからまたまた発見された。それを最初に発見したのはホームズであったが、彼は得意げにそれを指さして見せた。馬蹄の跡に並んで、男の靴あとが明らかに認められたのである。
「これまでは馬だけだったのに!」
私は思わずに走った。
「その通りさ。今までは馬だけだったんだ。や、や、これはどうだ!」
人と馬との足跡はそこで急に方向を転じて、キングス・パイランドの方へ向っていたのである。ホームズは呻吟したが、そのままその足跡を追って新らしい方向へ歩き出した。そして、彼はじっと足跡ばかり見て歩いたが、私はふと横の方に眼をやってみると、驚いたことには、少し離れたところに同じ足跡が、再びケープルトンの方へ向っているのを発見した。私がそれを注意すると、ホームズは、
「ワトソン君、お手柄だ! おかげでうんと無駄足をふまされるのが助かった。さ、あの足跡を辿って進もう」
そこから先きはあまり歩かなくともよかった。足跡はケープルトン調馬場の厩舎の入口に通ずるアスファルト舗装の道路の前でつきていたのである。そこまで歩いて行くと、厩舎から一人の馬丁が飛び出して来た。
「ここは用のない者の来るところじゃねえだよ」
「いや、ちょっとものを伺いたいのだがね」
ホームズは二本の指をチョッキのポケットへ入れていった。
「明日の朝五時に来たいと思うんだけれど、サイラス・ブラウンさんに会うにはちと早すぎるかね?」
「ようがしょうとも。来さえすれば会えますだ。旦那はいつでも朝は一番に起きるだから。だが、そういえば旦那が出て来ましたぜ。お前さまじかにきいてみなさるがいいだ。はあれ、とんでもねえ、お前さまからお金貰ったことが分れば、たちまちお払い箱だあ。後で――なんなら後でね」
シャーロック・ホームズがいったん出した半クラウン銀貨をポケットへ納めると、そこへ怖い顔をした年輩の男が、猟用の鞭を振り振り大跨《おおまた》に門から出て来た。
「どうしたんだ、ドウソン? べちゃべちゃと喋らずと、早く仕事を片付けるんだ! そして君達は? 一体何の用があってこんなところへ来たんですい?」
「御主人、ちょっと十分ばかりお話がしたいんですが」
ホームズはニコニコしていった。
「用もねえのにうろうろしてるような者の相手になってる暇はおれにゃねえな。ここは知らねえ者の来るところじゃねえ。さっさと帰った帰った。帰らねえと犬を嗾《け》しかけるぞ」
ホームズは上半身を前へ曲げるようにして、調馬師の耳へ何か囁いた。と、ブラウンはぎくりとして、生際《はえぎわ》まで真赤になった。
「嘘だッ! それあとんでもねえ大うそだッ!」
「よろしい! それじゃここで大きな声でそれを証拠立ててみようか? それとも中へ入って客間で静かに話し合いますか?」
「いや、それじゃ中へ入ってもらいましょうか」
ホームズはニヤリとして、
「ワトソン君、ほんの二三分間で出て来るからね。じゃブラウンさん、お言葉に従って中へ入れてもらいましょうか」
二三分間といったのが、きっかり二十分はかかった。ホームズがブラウンとつれ立って出て来た時には、夕映《ゆうばえ》は消え去って、四辺《あたり》は灰色の黄昏が迫りかけていた。たった二十分の間に、サイラス・ブラウンの変りようったらなかった。顔の色といったら灰のように蒼ざめ、額には汗の玉を浮べ、手に持つ猟鞭は嵐の中の小枝のようにゆらいでいた。そして横暴で尊大なさっきの態度はどこへやら、まるで主人に仕える忠実な犬のように、ホームズの側でかしこまっている有様だった。
「それではお指図の通りに致します。必ず致しますから」
「必ず間違わないようにしてもらいたい」
ホームズはブラウンをじろじろ眺めながらいった。
ブラウンはホームズの視線に威圧されて、ぱちぱちと瞬きをした。
「はいはい、決して間違いは致しません。必ず出します。それからあれは初めから変えておきましょうか、それともまた――」
ホームズはちょっと考えていたが、急に噴き出して、
「いや、そのままがいい。それについては後で手紙を出そう。もう狡《ず》るいことをするじゃないよ。さもないと――」
「大丈夫です! どうぞ私を信じて下さい」
「当日はあくまでもお前さんのもののように扱ってくれないと困る」
「どうぞ私にお任せ下さい」
「よろしい、安心していよう。では明日手紙を上げるから」
ホームズはブラウンが震える手をのべて握手を求めたのを構わずに、くるりと向きを代えてそのまま私と一緒にキングス・パイランドの方へ帰って行った。
「サイラス・ブラウンのようなあんな傲慢で臆病で狡猾な三拍子そろった奴を見たことがない」
ホームズは歩きながらいった。
「じゃ、あの馬を持っていたんだね?」
「初めはつべこべと誤魔化そうとしたから、あの晩、いや朝のあいつの行動を正確に話してやったら、図星を指されたと見えて、とうとう兜を脱いだよ。僕が見ていたとでも思い込んだらしく。君はあの足跡が妙に爪先が角ばっていたのも、ブラウンの穿いていた靴がちょうどそれに適合する形だったのも、無論気がついたろう。そして部下の使用人にはこんなことが出来るものじゃないことも――だから、僕は毎朝あいつが一番に起きる習慣であること、あの朝も早く起きてみると、荒地によその馬がうろうろしているので、出て行ってみたところ驚いたことには、それが白銀号だった――白銀というのは額が真白なところから出た名なんだが、自分が大金を賭けてる馬の唯一の強敵が手に入ったんでびっくりしただろうと、そのことについて委しく話してやった。最初は、キングス・パイランドへつれて行こうとしたが、急に魔がさして、競馬のすむまでかくしておいたらという考えを起し、そっとケープルトンへつれ戻ってかくしておいただろうといってやったもんだから、あいつもとうとう降参して、どうかして自分が罰せられないですむ方法はないかと考えるまでになったんだ」
「だって、あの厩舎はグレゴリ警部が調べたんだろう?」
「馬の扱いもあいつぐらいになると、どうにでもぺてんの利くもんだよ」
「だって君は、ブラウンに馬を預けておいて心配はないのかい? あの馬に傷をつければ、どの点から見てもブラウンの利益になるんだのに」
「安心したまえ。ブラウンは掌中の玉のように馬を大切にするから。少しでも罪を軽くしてもらうには馬を安全にしておくのが、唯一の方法だと、ちゃんと心得ているんだ」
「だが、ロス大佐のあの様子じゃどんなことをしたって、寛大な処置をとりそうもないね」
「この事件は大佐の一存じゃきまらないんだ。僕は自分の思う通りに歩を進めていいように話しておく。そこは警察の役人でない有難さ。君はどう思ったか知らないが、大佐の態度は僕には少々|素気《そっけ》なさすぎた。だから費用は先持ちで、ちょっとばかり面白いことをしてやろうと思うんだ。馬のことは大佐には何んにもいわずにおきたまえ」
「いいとも、君が許すまでは黙ってるよ」
「もっともこんなことはジョン・ストレーカ殺しの犯人問題に比べれば、ごく些細なことだがね」
「じゃ、これからその方に専念するつもりなのか?」
「いいや、夜行列車で一緒にロンドンへ帰ろう」
ホームズのこの言葉に私はひどく驚かされた。デヴォンシャへ来てまだ二三時間にしかならないのに、これほど素晴しい成功を持って進捗しつつある事件を、すっぱりと見切りをつけてしまおうとする彼の腹が、私には分らなかった。いろいろ訊ねてみたが、彼が黙々として、ストレーカの家へ帰りつくまで一言も発しなかった。帰ってみると、大佐は警部と一緒に客間で待っていた。
「私達は今晩の夜中の汽車でロンドンへ引揚げます」
ホームズはいった。
「おかげでダートムアの美しい空気を、しばらく呼吸させていただきました」
これを聞いて警部は呆気にとられ、大佐は唇に冷笑を浮べた。
「では、ストレーカ殺しの犯人は捕まらんと断念されたんですか?」
ホームズは昂然として、
「非常な困難が横《よこた》わってることは事実です。それにしてもこの火曜日にあなたの馬が競馬に出られることは、相違あるまいと思われます。どうか騎手の御用意をお忘れないように。それから、ストレーカ氏の写真を一枚拝借願いたいと思いますが」
グレゴリ警部はポケットに持っていた封筒から一枚取出して、ホームズに渡した。
「グレゴリさんは私が欲しいと思うものはいつも先廻りして用意しておいて下さるですね、有難う。ところで、しばらく皆さまにお待ちを願って、女中に二三質問したいことがありますが――」
ホームズが部屋を出て行くと大佐は露骨にいった。
「ロンドンなんかからわざわざ探偵を呼んでどうも馬鹿を見ちゃった。あの男が来てからこればかりも捗ったことか!」
「少なくとも白銀が競馬に出ることだけはホームズは保証しましたよ」
私は口を入れた。
「なるほど、その保証はあった」
大佐は冷笑を浮べて、
「保証よりは馬を早く戻してもらった方がいい」
私がホームズのために弁明しようとしたところへ、彼は入って来た。
「それでは皆さん、いつでもタヴィストックへお供いたしましょう」
私達が馬車に乗ろうとすると、一人の若者が扉《ドア》を押えていてくれた。ホームズはつと何か考えついたらしく若者の袖を引いて訊ねた。
「調馬場の柵の中に羊が少しいるようだが、誰が世話するのかね?」
「私がやりますんで」
「近頃何か羊に変ったことはなかったかね?」
「へえ、大したこともございませんが、三頭だけどういうものか跛《ちんば》になりましたんで」
ホームズはいと満足げだった。ニッコリと笑って、頻りに両手をこすり合せていた。
「大変な想像だよ、ワトソン君、非常に大胆な想像が当ったよ。グレゴリさん、羊の中に妙な病気が流行しているのは、大《おおい》に御注意なさったらいいと思います。じゃ、馭者君やって下さい」
ロス大佐は依然としてホームズを軽蔑するらしい顔をしていたが、警部はいたく注意を喚起させられたらしかった。
「あなたはそれを重大視されますか?」
警部はいった。
「極めて重大視します」
「その他何か私の注意すべきことはないでしょうか?」
「あの晩の犬の不思議な行動に御注意なさるといいでしょう」
「犬は全然何もしなかったはずですが」
「そこが不思議な行動だと申すのです」

それから四日たって私達はウェセクス賞杯争覇戦を見るために、再びウィンチェスタ行の汽車に乗った。約束通りロス大佐は停車場の入口まで来て待っていてくれたので、私達はそのまま大佐の四頭立《よんとうだて》馬車で市はずれの競馬場へ向った。大佐はひどく暗い顔をして、更に元気がなかった。
「私の馬を一向見かけないようですがね」
大佐はいった。
「ごらんになれば御自分の馬だからお分りになるでしょう」
ホームズはそういった。
大佐はムッとして、
「私は二十年来競馬場に出入りしているが、只今のようなお訊ねを受けるのは始めてです。あの馬の純白の額と、斑の前脚とを見れば、子供にだって分ることです」
「賭けはどんな模様です」
「その点だけはどうも妙です。昨日なら十五対一でも売り手があったのに、だんだん差が少くなって、今では三対一でもどうですかな」
「ふむ!」ホームズは独りごちて、
「何か知った奴があるんだな、たしかにそうです」
馬車が大スタンド近くの入口から入る時、競争加入者表を見あげると、次のように書き出されてあった。
[#ここから2字下げ]
ウェセクス賞杯競馬
各出場馬金五〇ソヴリン。同五歳馬にて一着には金一〇〇〇ソヴリンを副賞す。二着二〇〇ポンド。新コース(一哩八分の五)
一、ヒース・ニウトン氏 黒人(赤色《せきしょく》帽、肉桂色《にくけいしょく》短衣《ジャケツ》)
二、ワードロ大佐 拳闘家(淡紅色《たんこうしょく》帽、青|及《および》黒|短衣《ジャケツ》)
三、バックウォータ卿 デスボロ(黄色《こうしょく》帽、袖同色)
四、ロス大佐 白銀(黒色《こくしょく》帽、赤色|短衣《ジャケツ》)
五、バルモーラル公爵 アイリス(黄及黒の縞)
六、シングルフォド卿 ラスパ(紫色《ししょく》帽、袖黒)
[#ここで字下げ終わり]
「私の方ではもう一頭の方を見合せて、すべての希望をあなたの言葉につないでいるんです」
大佐はいった、
「おや、これはどうだ! 白銀はちゃんと出ているな!」
「白銀は五対四!」
賭場《かけば》から喚き声が起った。
「白銀は五対四! デスボロは十五対三! 場《じょう》に出れば五対四!」
「ぞろぞろ出て行くぜ」
私が注意をした。
「ああ、六頭全部いる!」
「六頭全部だ! してみると私の馬もいるんだな!」
大佐は叫び声を挙げた。
「だが、白銀はいない! 黒帽赤|短衣《ジャケツ》はここを通らなかった」
「いや、まだ五頭通っただけです。今度のがそうに違いありません」
私がこういった時、逞ましい栗毛の逸物が重量検査所から出て来て、ゆるやかな駈足で私達の前を通った。鞍上《くらうえ》にはロス大佐の色別《しきべつ》として有名な黒と赤との騎手が乗っていた。
「あれは私の馬じゃない!」
持主の大佐は叫んだ。
「あいつには額に白い毛がない! ホームズさん、あんたは一体何をやったんですッ?」
「まあ、まあ、あの馬がどんなことになるか見ていましょう」
ホームズは騒がずにいって私の双眼鏡をとってしばらく一心に眺めていたが、
「見事だ! 素晴らしいスタートだ! や、や、来たぞ! コーナを廻って来たぞ!」
馬車の上から見ていると、やがて直線部に来た時の彼等は壮大であった。六頭の馬は一枚の敷物でかくせるくらい接近して馳《かけ》っていた。が、半ば頃まではケープ[#「プ」は底本では「ブ」]ルトンの黄色がその中の先頭を切っていたが、私達の前まで来た時はデスボロは力つきて出足鈍り、大佐の馬は突進してそれを抜き、決勝点に入った時は、優に六馬身の差があった。バルモーラル公のアイリス号はずっとおくれて三着になった。
「とにかく、勝《かつ》には勝った」
大佐はホッとして、手で両眼《りょうがん》を拭き払いながら、
「しかし、正直なところ私には何が何んだかさっぱり分りません。ホームズさん、もういい加減に教えて下すってもよくはありませんか」
「申し上げましょう。何もかも申し上げましょう。みんなであっちへ行って馬を見てやりましょう。ここにいますよ」
ホームズは馬主とその連れだけしか入《い》れない重量検査所へ入って行きながら、
「この馬の顔と脚とをアルコールで洗っておやりなさい。そうすればもとのままの白銀だということが分りますから」
「えッ! これあ驚きましたな!」
「あるいかさま師の手に入っていたのを見つけ出して、勝手ながらその時のままの姿で出場させたわけです」
「どうもあなたの慧眼は驚くべきものです。馬は非常に調子がいいようです。全く今までになかったいい調子です。あなたの手腕を疑ぐったりして、なんと謝罪していいか分りません。こうして大切な馬を取戻して下すったのですから、この上はジョン・ストレーカ殺しの犯人を見つけて下されば、これに越す幸いはありません」
「加害者も捕えておきました」
ホームズはすましていった。
大佐は無論、私までも驚いて彼の顔を眺めやった。
「えッ! 捕まったって? どこにいます? それでは?」
「ここにいます」
「ここに? どこです?」
「今現に我々と一緒にいます」
大佐はこの一語にカッとなって、
「ホームズさん、あなたのおかげを受けてることは十分認めもし、感謝もしていますが、只今のお言葉は冗談にしては少し重すぎはしませんか。あなたは私を侮辱しますか!」
ホームズは笑っていった。
「大佐、あなたを何も犯人だと申したのではありませんよ。真犯人はあなたのすぐ後に立っていますよ」
ロス大佐は進みよって、名馬の沢《つや》やかな額に手をかけたが、急に気がついて、
「馬がッ!」
と叫んだ。私も同時に叫んだ。
「そうです、馬がです。ジョン・ストレーカは全然あなたの信頼するに足りない男であります、馬は正当防禦のために殺したにすぎないことを申し上げれば、この馬の罪もいく分軽くなるわけでしょう。ところでベルが鳴り出しました。今度の競馬で私は少し勝ちたいと思いますから、その説明はいずれ後でゆっくりと委しく申し上げることにしましょう」

その晩、ロンドンへの帰りを、私達は寝台車の一隅に席を占めたが、前週の月曜日にダートムアの競馬場で起った出来事を、順序を追ってホームズは話し、そしていかにしてそれを解決するに至ったかを語り聞かせてくれたから、汽車の無聊を感じるどころか、ロス大佐にしても私にしても時間のたつのを知らなかったくらいである。
「実のところ、新聞の報道を根拠に組立てた私の意見は全然誤っていました。しかも、新聞の記事にも正しい暗示の出ていたことは出ていたのですが、いろんな他の事項のためにそれがかくされていたのです。デヴォンシャへ行くまでは、フィツロイ・シムソンが真犯人だと私は信じていました。もっとも彼に対する証拠は完全だとはむろん考えていませんでしたけれど。
ところが、いよいよ馬車でストレーカの家に着いた時に、ふと羊のカレー料理が非常に重要な意味を持っていることに気がつきました。あの時、私がぼんやりして、みんなが降りてしまったのにまだ馬車の中に残っていたことを覚えていらっしゃるでしょう。あの時私は、こんな明瞭な手懸りがあるのに、どうして今まで見逃していたろうかと、我れながらつくづく驚いていたのです」
「と仰しゃられてもまだ私にはさっぱり分りませんなあ」
大佐はいった。
「あれが私の推理の第一階梯となったのです。阿片末は無味なものではありません。匂いは不快ではありませんが、すぐに知れるものです。だから普通の料理にこれを混ぜれば一口でそれと気がついて食べるのを止《や》めてしまいます。そこでカレーを使えばこの味を消してしまいます。全くの他人であるフィツロイ・シムソンが、この夜あの一家に、カレー料理を食べさせるように仕込んだろうなんてことは、全然想像も許されないことです。それかといって、阿片の味を消す料理の出た晩に、折よくシムソンが阿片を使うつもりで来たと考えるのも、あまりに奇怪な暗合というものです。そんな馬鹿なことは考えられません。だから、シムソンはこの事件から除外することが出来、その夜の御馳走をカレー料理と定《き》めることの出来る人、すなわちストレーカ夫婦に我々の注意は集中されるわけです。阿片は厩舎に残ってるハンタの分として、別の皿へとり分けられてから入れたものです。同じものを食べた他の人達に、異状のなかったのでも知れます。では、女中に気づかれないようにその皿に近附いたのは夫婦の中《うち》果してどっちでしょうか?
一つの正しい結論は、必然第二の結論を暗示するものです。この問題を解く前に私は、あの晩犬が騒がなかったという重大な事実に想到しました。シムソン事件のおかげで私は厩舎に犬の飼ってあることを知りましたが、夜中に誰かが厩舎へ入って馬をつれ出したのに犬が吠えなかった、少くとも二階に寝ていた二人の若者の眼をさますほどには吠えなかったという事実に考え至りました。これは馬をつれ出した者が、犬のよく知ってる人物であるということを示しています。
そこで私は真夜中に厩舎へ行って白銀をつれ出したのはジョン・ストレーカであると断じました。断じてよいと思いました。しからばそれは何んのためであったか? 無論不正の目的のためであることはいうまでもありません。でなければ何んで薬で厩番を眠らせたりしましょう。しかも、不正な目的とまでは分っても、それが果してどんなことであるか私には分りません。調馬師が自分の預かっている馬を故意に痛めて出場不可能ならしめ、それによってうまうまと大金を得る例はこれまでもいくらもあったことです。時には騎手を手に入れて八百長をやらせたり、また時には、もっと確実で、分りにくい方法を執ることもありますが、この場合は果してどうでしょう? ストレーカのポケットにあった品物を見れば、何かこの間の消息を知る手懸りがありそうなものだと私は思いました。
その品物は果して役に立ちました。お忘れもありますまいが、ストレーカは不思議なナイフを握って倒れていました。あれは決して普通の人間の持つナイフではありません。ワトソン君も申した通り、あれは極めて緻密な外科手術に使うメスの一種です。しかも、まさしくあの晩は緻密な手術をするため用意されていたものなんです。大佐、あなたの競馬に関する広い経験をもってすれば、馬の膝膕部《ひざかがみ》の腱に、外面に何んの痕跡をも残さず皮下手術的にちょっと傷をつけることは容易であって、しかもそれをやられた馬は軽い跛《びっこ》を引き出すけれど、調馬中に筋でも違《たが》えたかそれとも軽いリウマチスに罹ったかということになって、不正の行われたのは決して分らないということを御承知でございましょうね」
「不届きな奴め! そんなことを企みおったのかッ」
「そこでジョン・ストレーカがなぜ馬を荒地《あれち》へつれ出したかは説明がつきます。馬のような敏感な動物はナイフの先をちくりと感じただけでも烈しく騒ぎたてて、どんなによく眠っている者をでも起してしまいます。だから、その手術は屋外の広い場所ですることが、絶対に必要だったのです」
「私が盲目《めくら》だった。だから、蝋燭を持っていたり、マッチをすったりしたんですな」
「無論そうです。ところでポケットから出た品物を調べてみると、私は犯行の方法を発見したばかりでなく、幸いにしてその動機をも知ることが出来ました。大佐、あなたは世間の広い方ですが、他人の勘定書を持ってる者がどこにありましょう? 普通の人間ならば自分の払いを始末するだけで十分のはずです。私はあの書附を見てストレーカは二重生活をやって、第二の家をどこかに持っているのだと断定しました。しかも書附の内容を見れば、それには婦人の関係していることが知れます。非常に贅沢な好みの婦人です。あなたが雇人にいくら寛大であり、いくら酬《むく》いられるからといって、彼等が自分の女に二十ギンの散歩服を買ってやれる身分だとは考えられますまい。私はストレーカの細君にそれとなく服のことを訊ねてみますと、その服は果して細君の買ってもらったものではないことが分りました。この上はその帽飾店のところを控えて帰って、ストレーカの写真を持って店へ行って訊ねてみれば、事件の秘密はすっかりさらけ出せるだろうと思います。
そのあとは極めて簡単です。ストレーカは馬をつれ出して、燈火《ともしび》をつけても人の眼につかぬようにあの凹みへ降りて行きました。その前に、シムソンは逃げる時、襟飾《ネクタイ》を落して逃げましたが、ストレーカは何か考えがあってそれを拾っておきました。おそらくそれで馬の脚でもしばるつもりだったのでしょう。で、凹みの底へ降りて行くとすぐに、馬の後へ廻ってマッチをすりました。ところが馬は急にマッチの光に驚いて、同時に動物の不思議な本能で、自分の身に何か危険が企まれていることを感じ、ぱっと跳ね上りました。その拍子にストレーカは額を蹴られて倒れたのです。雨は降っていましたが、仕事が細かいためストレーカはその前に外套を脱いでおきました。そして、倒れる時自分で自分の腿を刺したのです。これですっかりお分りですか?」
「驚いた! 実に驚きました。まるで傍で見ていたようです!」
「正直に申すと、私の最後の断定は極めて大胆でした。ストレーカのような狡猾な男が、この難しい腱の手術をするに、少しも練習なしにいきなりやるはずはないと気がついたのです。ではどうしたら練習が出来るでしょう? その時、私はふと羊のことを思い、訊ねてみると、自分でも驚くほど私の推定が当ってるのを知りました」
「これで何もかも完全に判明しました」
「ロンドンへ帰ってから帽飾店へ行ってみますと、ストレーカはダービシャといって、特に高価な服の好きな、見栄坊の妻を持ったその店の上客だということが分りました。この女がストレーカを借財で首のまわらぬまでにし、遂にこの悲惨な結果に終った陰謀を企ませたことは申すまでもありません」
「すっかり分りましたが、一つだけまだお話し下さらないことがあります。馬はいったいどこにいたのですか?」
「馬ですか、馬は逸走してしまって、あの附近のある人の保護を受けていたのです。その辺のことは大目に見ておかなければなりますまい。ああ、ここはどうやらクラパムの乗換駅ですね? ヴィクトリア・ステーションまではもう十分とかかりません。大佐、私のところへお寄り下すって、葉巻でもおやりになりませんか? この他に何かお訊ねになりたいことでもありましたら、何んなりと喜んでお答えいたします」

 

Reference:

和訳 青空文庫 三上於菟吉翻訳

底本: 世界探偵小説全集 第三卷 シヤーロツク・ホームズの記憶
出版社: 平凡社
サブコンテンツ

このページの先頭へ